Bruins hire Jim Montgomery as new head coach

The Boston Bruins have hired Jim Montgomery as their new head coach. Montgomery replaces Bruce Cassidy, who was fired on June 6.

“Jim has a winning history, and throughout the interview process he conveyed his ability to connect with all types of players while also demanding that his teams play with structure. We are excited for Jim to begin to make his imprint on our team,” said Bruins general manager Don Sweeney.

The 53-year-old Montgomery had spent the past two seasons as an assistant coach with the St. Louis Blues. The move was made official on Friday, the same day his contract expired.

This will be Montgomery’s second NHL head coaching job. He was behind the Dallas Stars’ bench from May 2018 until Dec. 10, 2019 when he was fired for a “material act of unprofessionalism,” according to general manager Jim Nill. Three weeks later Montgomery checked himself into a rehabilitation center for alcohol abuse.

Montgomery and the ‘process’

The new Bruins head coach brings a “process” for success to Boston. It’s a recipe that was inspired by the late Shawn Walsh, Montgomery’s head coach when he was a player at the University of Maine. It includes winning 60% of face-offs, blocking shots, giving up at most three odd-man rushes, dishing out 50 hits, winning special teams and net front battles, and staying disciplined when it comes to committing penalties.

“If we’re four out of seven in a game, we’re probably going to win that game,” Montgomery wrote on The Coaches’ Site in 2016. “And if we’ve got five or six, the games actually become lopsided in our favour.”

Over the last two seasons, with Montgomery heading special teams, the Blues rank second in the NHL on the power play (25.5%) and 10th (81.3%) on the penalty kill. (The Stars were No. 4 in face-offs, fifth in blocked shots, and fifth on the penalty kill in his only full season in charge in Dallas.)

Stars missing from the start

When Montgomery gathers his players for his first training camp in Boston, he’ll do so without a number of familiar faces. Brad Marchand, Charlie McAvoy, and Matt Grzelcyk will miss the start of the season while Patrice Bergeron has not officially made a decision on his future — though, it appears he will be back, possibly with David Krejčí, who is pondering what’s next for his career.

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

NHL free agency tracker 2022: Full list of offseason signings

It’s time for NHL Free Agency! The offseason is under way and with the market opening July 13 there will be plenty of action this summer. Some teams have already been busy getting their 2022-23 rosters in order. Check back here for all of the signings that teams will be making in hopes of improving their chances at winning the 2023 Stanley Cup.

NHL Free Agency Signings

July 1

• Lightning signs Nick Paul to a seven-year, $22.05 million deal

June 30

• Kings sign Matt Villalta to a one year, $787,500 deal
• Kraken signs Gustav Olofsson to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Sabres sign Craig Anderson to a one-year, $2 million deal
• Stars sign Riley Tufte to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Stars sign Scott Wedgewood to a two-year, $2 million deal

June 29

• Kings sign Kevin Fiala to a seven-year, $55.125 million deal (link)
• Lightning signs Darren Raddysh to a two-year, $1,525,000 deal
• Sabres sign Sean Malone to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Stars sign Ryan Shea to a one-year, $750,000 deal

June 28

• Stars sign Joseph Cecconi to a one-year, $750,000 deal

June 27

• Canucks sign Sheldone Dries to a two-year, $1,525,000 deal
• Canucks sign John Stevens to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Canucks sign Guillaume Brisebois to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Maple Leafs sign Timothy Liljegren to a two-year, $2.8 million deal
• Panthers sign Matt Kiersted to a two-year, $1,525,000 deal

PHT Morning Skate: Puljujärvi’s future; NHL offer sheet targets

Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from the NHL and around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.

• As every day passes, it’s more and more likely that Jesse Puljujärvi will be playing somewhere other than Edmonton next season. [Oilers Nation]

• Could Martin Nečas and Jake Oettinger be prime offers sheet targets this summer? [Daily Faceoff]

• Blackhawks GM Kyle Davidson is not ruling out trading Alex DeBrincat. What sort of package could he deliver? [NHL.com]

• Now that Kevin Fiala is gone, what comes next for the Wild and will they be able to put up a fight in the Central Division? [Zone Coverage]

• Herb Carnegie’s daughter, Bernice, on the pride her family feels after learning of the news her dad will be inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame. [TSN]

• How the Muslim community is reveling in Nazem Kadri‘s Stanley Cup conquest with the Avalanche. [Sportsnet]

• Lightning assistants Derek Lalonde and Jeff Halpern are on Steve Yzerman’s radar as the Red Wings continue their head coaching search. [MLive]

• The QMJHL’s Saint John Sea Dogs won the Memorial Cup Wednesday night over the Hamilton Bulldogs. [Watertown Daily Times]

• The Toronto Maple Leafs announced Wednesday that Jim Pappin, who scored the winning goal in the 1967 Stanley Cup final, has died at age 82. [CBC]

• Where it all went wrong for the Jets and what happens next? [NBC Sports Edge]

• On Ron Hextall’s tenure so far in Pittsburgh: “Just based on nothing more than historical track record here and moves we have actually seen get made in Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, Hextall seems incredibly risk averse. He seems more fearful of a deal going wrong and the potential downside of a significant trade or signing than the potential reward that could come from such a deal. That might explain why Rust’s contract got done before Evgeni Malkin or Kris Letang. Or why he was so quick to re-sign Carter.” [Pensburgh]

• Toronto Six goaltender Carly Jackson is just getting started and is eyeing an Isobel Cup. [The Ice Garden]

————

Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

PHT Morning Skate: World Juniors schedule released; Rangers’ options at center

Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from the NHL and around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.

• The updated 2022 World Junior Championship schedule is out with the tournament beginning August 9 in Edmonton. In December, the tournament was canceled days after it started due to COVID-19. [IIHF]

• “Scotiabank announced on Tuesday that it is pausing its sponsorship of Hockey Canada in the wake of sexual assault allegations that came to light last month, sparking a number of other sponsors to follow suit while demanding change.” [Sportsnet]

• What options at center could Rangers GM Chris Drury explore this summer? [LoHud]

• The Lightning are firm believers their Cup contending days are not over. [TSN]

• Why Islanders defenseman Noah Dobson is a prime offer sheet target. [Hockey Tactics]

• Important dates to know on the NHL off-season calendar. [Raw Charge]

• Looking back at the 2012 NHL Draft and how it all went wrong for the top four picks. [Daily Faceoff]

• “The National Hockey League has secured a long-term apparel and headwear licensing agreement with premium lifestyle sportswear and culture brand Mitchell & Ness. The company will gain the rights to design and manufacture officially-licensed lifestyle apparel, headwear and accessories for the NHL and all 32 NHL teams.” [Sports Business]

• John Stevens joins Bruce Cassidy’s bench in Vegas while Sean Burke is the Golden Knights’ director of goaltending. [Golden Knights]

————

Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs 2022 schedule, TV info

The 2022 Stanley Cup Final featured the Colorado Avalanche and Tampa Bay Lightning, with the Avalanche winning the series in six games.

In the Eastern Conference Final, the Lightning dispatched the New York Rangers in six games as they will now vie for their third consecutive title. The Avalanche swept the Edmonton Oilers in the Western Conference Final and are playing in the Stanley Cup Final for the first time since 2001.

In the Cup Final, the Avalanche won the first two games before the Lightning made it a series by taking Game 3. The teams traded wins in Games 4 and 5, setting the stage for Colorado to win its third championship in franchise history and first since the 2000-01 NHL season.

2022 NHL playoff schedule: Stanley Cup Final

COLORADO AVALANCHE v. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING (COL wins series 4-2)

Game 1 – Avalanche 4, Lightning 3 (OT)
Game 2 – Avalanche 7, Lightning 0
Game 3 – Lightning 6, Avalanche 2
Game 4 – Avalanche 3, Lightning 2 (OT)
Game 5 – Lightning 3, Avalanche 2
Game 6 – Avalanche 2, Lightning 1

2022 NHL playoff schedule: Eastern Conference Final

NEW YORK RANGERS v. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING (TB wins series 4-2)

Game 1 – Rangers 6, Lightning 2
Game 2 – Rangers 3, Lightning 2
Game 3 – Lightning 3, Rangers 2
Game 4 – Lightning 4, Rangers 1
Game 5 – Lightning 3, Rangers 1
Game 6 – Lightning 2, Rangers 1

2022 NHL playoff schedule: Western Conference Final

EDMONTON OILERS v. COLORADO AVALANCHE (COL wins series 4-0)
Game 1 – Avalanche 8, Oilers 6
Game 2 – Avalanche 4, Oilers 0
Game 3 – Avalanche 4, Oilers 2
Game 4 – Avalanche 6, Oilers 5 (OT)

2022 NHL playoff schedule: Second Round – Eastern Conference

NEW YORK RANGERS v. CAROLINA HURRICANES (NYR wins series 4-3)
Game 1 – Hurricanes 2, Rangers 1 (OT)
Game 2 – Hurricanes 2, Rangers 0
Game 3 – Rangers 3, Hurricanes 1
Game 4 – Rangers 4, Hurricanes 1
Game 5 – Hurricanes 3, Rangers 1
Game 6 – Rangers 5, Hurricanes 2
Game 7 – Rangers 6, Hurricanes 2

FLORIDA PANTHERS v. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING (TB wins series 4-0)

Game 1 – Lightning 4, Panthers 1
Game 2 – Lightning 2, Panthers 1
Game 3 – Lightning 5, Panthers 1
Game 4 – Lightning 2, Panthers 0

2022 NHL playoff schedule: Second Round – Western Conference

COLORADO AVALANCHE v. ST. LOUIS BLUES (COL wins series 4-2)
Game 1 – Avalanche 3, Blues 2 (OT)
Game 2 – Blues 4, Avalanche 1
Game 3 – Avalanche 5, Blues 2
Game 4 – Avalanche 6, Blues 3
Game 5 – Blues 5, Avalanche 4 (OT)
Game 6 – Avalanche 3, Blues 2

CALGARY FLAMES v. EDMONTON OILERS (EDM wins series 4-1)
Game 1 –
Flames 9, Oilers 6
Game 2 – Oilers 5, Flames 3
Game 3 – Oilers 4, Flames 1
Game 4 – Oilers 5, Flames 3
Game 5 – Oilers 5, Flames 4 (OT)

First Round – Eastern Conference

FLORIDA PANTHERS v. WASHINGTON CAPITALS (FLA wins series 4-2)
Game 1: Capitals 4, Panthers 2
Game 2: Panthers 5, Capitals 1
Game 3: Capitals 6, Panthers 1
Game 4: Panthers 3, Capitals 2 (OT)
Game 5: Panthers 5, Capitals 3
Game 6: Panthers 4, Capitals 3 (OT)

CAROLINA HURRICANES v. BOSTON BRUINS (CAR wins series 4-3)
Game 1: Hurricanes 5, Bruins 1
Game 2: Hurricanes 5, Bruins 2
Game 3: Bruins 4, Hurricanes 2
Game 4: Bruins 5, Hurricanes 2
Game 5: Hurricanes 5, Bruins 1
Game 6: Bruins 5, Hurricanes 2
Game 7: Hurricanes 3, Bruins 2

TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS v. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING (TBL wins series 4-3)
Game 1: Maple Leafs 5, Lightning 0
Game 2: Lightning 5, Maple Leafs 3
Game 3: Maple Leafs 5, Lightning 2
Game 4: Lightning 7, Maple Leafs 3
Game 5: Maple Leafs 4, Lightning 3
Game 6: Lightning 4, Maple Leafs 3 (OT)
Game 7: Lightning 2, Maple Leafs 1

NEW YORK RANGERS v. PITTSBURGH PENGUINS (NYR wins series 4-3)
Game 1: Penguins 4, Rangers 3 (3OT)
Game 2: Rangers 5, Penguins 2
Game 3: Penguins 7, Rangers 4
Game 4: Penguins 7, Rangers 2
Game 5: Rangers 5, Penguins 3
Game 6: Rangers 5, Penguins 3
Game 7: Rangers 4, Penguins 3 (OT)

First Round – Western Conference

COLORADO AVALANCHE v. NASHVILLE PREDATORS (COL wins series 4-0)
Game 1: Avalanche 7, Predators 2
Game 2: Avalanche 2, Predators 1 (OT)
Game 3: Avalanche 7, Predators 3
Game 4: Avalanche 5, Predators 3

CALGARY FLAMES v. DALLAS STARS (CGY wins series 4-3)
Game 1: Flames 1, Stars 0
Game 2: Stars 2, Flames 0
Game 3: Stars 4, Flames 2
Game 4: Flames 4, Stars 1
Game 5: Flames 3, Stars 1
Game 6: Stars 4, Flames 2
Game 7: Flames 3, Stars 2 (OT)

EDMONTON OILERS vs. LOS ANGELES KINGS (EDM win series 4-3)
Game 1: Kings 4, Oilers 3
Game 2: Oilers 6, Kings 0
Game 3: Oilers 8, Kings 2
Game 4: Kings 4, Oilers 0
Game 5: Kings 5, Oilers 4 (OT)
Game 6: Oilers 4, Kings 2
Game 7: Oilers 2, Kings 0

MINNESOTA WILD v. ST. LOUIS BLUES (STL wins series 4-2)
Game 1: Blues 4, Wild 0
Game 2: Wild 6, Blues 2
Game 3: Wild 5, Blues 1
Game 4: Blues 5, Wild 2
Game 5: Blues 5, Wild 2
Game 6: Blues 5, Wild 1

PHT Morning Skate: MacKinnon’s influence on Avs; Dumba’s future with Wild

Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from the NHL and around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.

• Great story on Nathan MacKinnon‘s influence on the Stanley Cup champion Avalanche. [ESPN]

• How the Avalanche and Lightning helped build their Stanley Cup teams via the trade route. [TSN]

• What is Matt Dumba‘s future in Minnesota? [Zone Coverage]

• Daniel Alfredsson, Herb Carnegie, Roberto Luongo, Riikka Sallinen, and Daniel and Henrik Sedin will make up the Hockey Hall of Fame’s Class of 2022. [PHT]

• “Though Ottawa is his permanent home, Alfredsson is in Sweden at the moment and when he hadn’t heard anything by early evening Swedish time, he assumed this was not going to be his year – again. He and his family, plus friends, were in the backyard and it started to rain, so they had just gone inside to get out of the weather when the phone rang.” [Sportsnet]

• The case for Shane Wright to go No. 1 overall in next week’s NHL Draft. [NHL.com]

• What do you think about the “RoboPen” Penguins logo and should the team bring it back? [Pensburgh]

• A look at what happened to the Islanders this season. [NBC Sports Edge]

• Fun read on what players need to do to get ready for their summer vacation. [Daily Faceoff]

• Despite getting up in age, Brent Burns can still provide value for the Sharks. [NBC Sports Bay Area]

————

Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs 2022 schedule, TV info

The 2022 Stanley Cup Final featured the Colorado Avalanche and Tampa Bay Lightning, with the Avalanche winning the series in six games.

In the Eastern Conference Final, the Lightning dispatched the New York Rangers in six games as they will now vie for their third consecutive title. The Avalanche swept the Edmonton Oilers in the Western Conference Final and are playing in the Stanley Cup Final for the first time since 2001.

In the Cup Final, the Avalanche won the first two games before the Lightning made it a series by taking Game 3. The teams traded wins in Games 4 and 5, setting the stage for Colorado to win its third championship in franchise history and first since the 2000-01 NHL season.

2022 NHL playoff schedule: Stanley Cup Final

COLORADO AVALANCHE v. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING (COL wins series 4-2)

Game 1 – Avalanche 4, Lightning 3 (OT)
Game 2 – Avalanche 7, Lightning 0
Game 3 – Lightning 6, Avalanche 2
Game 4 – Avalanche 3, Lightning 2 (OT)
Game 5 – Lightning 3, Avalanche 2
Game 6 – Avalanche 2, Lightning 1

2022 NHL playoff schedule: Eastern Conference Final

NEW YORK RANGERS v. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING (TB wins series 4-2)

Game 1 – Rangers 6, Lightning 2
Game 2 – Rangers 3, Lightning 2
Game 3 – Lightning 3, Rangers 2
Game 4 – Lightning 4, Rangers 1
Game 5 – Lightning 3, Rangers 1
Game 6 – Lightning 2, Rangers 1

2022 NHL playoff schedule: Western Conference Final

EDMONTON OILERS v. COLORADO AVALANCHE (COL wins series 4-0)
Game 1 – Avalanche 8, Oilers 6
Game 2 – Avalanche 4, Oilers 0
Game 3 – Avalanche 4, Oilers 2
Game 4 – Avalanche 6, Oilers 5 (OT)

2022 NHL playoff schedule: Second Round – Eastern Conference

NEW YORK RANGERS v. CAROLINA HURRICANES (NYR wins series 4-3)
Game 1 – Hurricanes 2, Rangers 1 (OT)
Game 2 – Hurricanes 2, Rangers 0
Game 3 – Rangers 3, Hurricanes 1
Game 4 – Rangers 4, Hurricanes 1
Game 5 – Hurricanes 3, Rangers 1
Game 6 – Rangers 5, Hurricanes 2
Game 7 – Rangers 6, Hurricanes 2

FLORIDA PANTHERS v. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING (TB wins series 4-0)

Game 1 – Lightning 4, Panthers 1
Game 2 – Lightning 2, Panthers 1
Game 3 – Lightning 5, Panthers 1
Game 4 – Lightning 2, Panthers 0

2022 NHL playoff schedule: Second Round – Western Conference

COLORADO AVALANCHE v. ST. LOUIS BLUES (COL wins series 4-2)
Game 1 – Avalanche 3, Blues 2 (OT)
Game 2 – Blues 4, Avalanche 1
Game 3 – Avalanche 5, Blues 2
Game 4 – Avalanche 6, Blues 3
Game 5 – Blues 5, Avalanche 4 (OT)
Game 6 – Avalanche 3, Blues 2

CALGARY FLAMES v. EDMONTON OILERS (EDM wins series 4-1)
Game 1 –
Flames 9, Oilers 6
Game 2 – Oilers 5, Flames 3
Game 3 – Oilers 4, Flames 1
Game 4 – Oilers 5, Flames 3
Game 5 – Oilers 5, Flames 4 (OT)

First Round – Eastern Conference

FLORIDA PANTHERS v. WASHINGTON CAPITALS (FLA wins series 4-2)
Game 1: Capitals 4, Panthers 2
Game 2: Panthers 5, Capitals 1
Game 3: Capitals 6, Panthers 1
Game 4: Panthers 3, Capitals 2 (OT)
Game 5: Panthers 5, Capitals 3
Game 6: Panthers 4, Capitals 3 (OT)

CAROLINA HURRICANES v. BOSTON BRUINS (CAR wins series 4-3)
Game 1: Hurricanes 5, Bruins 1
Game 2: Hurricanes 5, Bruins 2
Game 3: Bruins 4, Hurricanes 2
Game 4: Bruins 5, Hurricanes 2
Game 5: Hurricanes 5, Bruins 1
Game 6: Bruins 5, Hurricanes 2
Game 7: Hurricanes 3, Bruins 2

TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS v. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING (TBL wins series 4-3)
Game 1: Maple Leafs 5, Lightning 0
Game 2: Lightning 5, Maple Leafs 3
Game 3: Maple Leafs 5, Lightning 2
Game 4: Lightning 7, Maple Leafs 3
Game 5: Maple Leafs 4, Lightning 3
Game 6: Lightning 4, Maple Leafs 3 (OT)
Game 7: Lightning 2, Maple Leafs 1

NEW YORK RANGERS v. PITTSBURGH PENGUINS (NYR wins series 4-3)
Game 1: Penguins 4, Rangers 3 (3OT)
Game 2: Rangers 5, Penguins 2
Game 3: Penguins 7, Rangers 4
Game 4: Penguins 7, Rangers 2
Game 5: Rangers 5, Penguins 3
Game 6: Rangers 5, Penguins 3
Game 7: Rangers 4, Penguins 3 (OT)

First Round – Western Conference

COLORADO AVALANCHE v. NASHVILLE PREDATORS (COL wins series 4-0)
Game 1: Avalanche 7, Predators 2
Game 2: Avalanche 2, Predators 1 (OT)
Game 3: Avalanche 7, Predators 3
Game 4: Avalanche 5, Predators 3

CALGARY FLAMES v. DALLAS STARS (CGY wins series 4-3)
Game 1: Flames 1, Stars 0
Game 2: Stars 2, Flames 0
Game 3: Stars 4, Flames 2
Game 4: Flames 4, Stars 1
Game 5: Flames 3, Stars 1
Game 6: Stars 4, Flames 2
Game 7: Flames 3, Stars 2 (OT)

EDMONTON OILERS vs. LOS ANGELES KINGS (EDM win series 4-3)
Game 1: Kings 4, Oilers 3
Game 2: Oilers 6, Kings 0
Game 3: Oilers 8, Kings 2
Game 4: Kings 4, Oilers 0
Game 5: Kings 5, Oilers 4 (OT)
Game 6: Oilers 4, Kings 2
Game 7: Oilers 2, Kings 0

MINNESOTA WILD v. ST. LOUIS BLUES (STL wins series 4-2)
Game 1: Blues 4, Wild 0
Game 2: Wild 6, Blues 2
Game 3: Wild 5, Blues 1
Game 4: Blues 5, Wild 2
Game 5: Blues 5, Wild 2
Game 6: Blues 5, Wild 1

NHL odds: Avs, Lightning Maple Leafs are 2023 Stanley Cup favorites

The Colorado Avalanche have dethroned the two-time defending Stanley Cup champion Tampa Bay Lightning. After a hard-fought six-game series, Jared Bednar’s team have finally reached the top of the NHL.

As we say goodbye to the 2021-22 NHL season, we begin to turn the page to 2022-23 with the NHL Draft and free agency taking place in a few weeks.

Before we see some big trades and destiny-shifting signings, let’s take a look at the betting favorites for the 2023 Stanley Cup, courtesy of our friends at PointsBet.

As you’ve expect, the Cup finalists, the Avalanche (+450) and Lightning, are two of the top three betting favorites with the Maple Leafs sharing similar odds to Tampa Bay (+900).

If you’re looking for a long shot, try the +50000 Arizona Coyotes.

POINTSBET 2023 NHL STANLEY CUP CHAMPION ODDS

Colorado Avalanche +450
Tampa Bay Lightning +900
Toronto Maple Leafs +900
Florida Panthers +1000
Carolina Hurricanes +1100
Vegas Golden Knights +1200
New York Rangers +1600
Minnesota Wild +1700
St. Louis Blues +1700
Calgary Flames +1800
Edmonton Oilers +1900
Boston Bruins +2200
Pittsburgh Penguins +2500
New York Islanders +3000
Washington Capitals +3500
Dallas Stars +3500
Detroit Red Wings +4000
Los Angeles Kings +4000
Vancouver Canucks +4500
Buffalo Sabres +5000
New Jersey Devils +6000
Nashville Predators +6000
Winnipeg Jets +6000
Philadelphia Flyers +7000
Ottawa Senators +7500
Anaheim Ducks +7500
Montreal Canadiens +10000
Columbus Blue Jackets +10000
Chicago Blackhawks +10000
San Jose Sharks +10000
Seattle Kraken +15000
Arizona Coyotes +50000

PointsBet is our Official Sports Betting Partner and we may receive compensation if you place a bet on PointsBet for the first time after clicking our links.

————

Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

I guess I can kiss Nazem Kadri’s ass now

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Even beyond that sea of shit from Blues fans that Kadri and those close to him had to wade through, he’s had to eat more than enough excrement before. And I wrote some of it. I still maintain Kadri cost the Avs their second round series last year against the Knights, where their complete lack of a second line cost them. A second line he anchored. Kadri was suspended for the remainder of the 2019 series against the Bruins when he was a Leaf. The Leafs lost in 7. Would his presence have made a difference in that coinflip of a series?

That’s in the past now. What Kadri is under no responsibility to recognize is that the frustration he caused came from an appreciation of just how special a player he is. Or at least it was in some circles. He’s one of the most demonic checking centers a coach can throw at any of the league’s premier scorers, and watch swallow them up. Even with one hand when he returned in this series, he ran a 70 percent expected goals percentage. And he can do all that while being a major offensive threat, as his 87 points in 71 regular season games would attest. Or his OT winner in Game 4 when he could barely grip his stick, much less come up with a shot that beat the best playoff goalie of all time clean (which is what Andrei Vasilevskiy is).

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But again, whatever justification I or any other of Kadri’s critics come up with doesn’t matter before we pucker up but good. Kadri will hit unrestricted free agency this summer and get a very rich deal. He will cause Leafs fans to toss and turn for years, even more than they already do, in their outwardly tortured existence they broadcast with the world’s biggest bullhorn at the thought that they drummed him out of town for the bounty of Tyson Barrie, a guy the Leafs moved on from in just one year. And Toronto remains running in place, forever grasping at the horizon from the first round. Kadri has a ring.

I’ll pucker up, Naz. I said you were a liability. And yet your arrival in Denver turned the Avs into a juggernaut, one that was rewarded properly last night. You may not be a lead guitarist, but you’re one of the best rhythm guitarists in the NHL. Show me those cheeks, I’m ready.

Hockey Hall of Fame: Who will make up the Class of 2022?

The Hockey Hall of Fame Class of 2022 will be announced Monday afternoon and there are a good number of options for the Selection Committee to consider.

First-year eligible players for 2022 include Roberto Luongo, Rick Nash, Caroline Ouellette, Riikka Sallinen, Daniel Sedin, Henrik Sedin, and Henrik Zetterberg. There are also the likes of Daniel Alfredsson, Jennifer Botterill, Karyn Bye-Dietz, Alex Mogilny, and Keith Tkachuk, among others, who have been waiting various lengths of time to get a call from the Hall.

After the COVID-19 pandemic forced the Selection Committee to postpone voting on a 2021 class, the tradition returned as the six-person 2020 group was inducted in Toronto. Jarome Iginla, Marian Hossa, Kevin Lowe, Doug Wilson, Kim St-Pierre and Ken Holland were honored and finally able to deliver their speeches for the momentous occasion.

The 2022 Induction Celebration will be held Nov. 14 in Toronto.

Let’s take a look at who might make up the Hockey Hall of Fame Class of 2022.

THE LOCKS

Daniel and Henrik Sedin — The Canucks duo have long been favorites for first-ballot admission due to not only their NHL play, but also representing Sweden. We’ll start with Daniel and his 393 goals and 1,041 points in 1,306 games all with Vancouver. He won the Ted Lindsay Award and Art Ross Trophy, and was named a First Team All-Star in 2011. He holds the Canucks franchise record for goals and power play goals (138). With Sweden he won an Olympic gold medal in 2006 and silver in 2014. He also helped Tre Kronor to gold at the 2013 World Championship and 1998 U-18 Worlds.

Henrik finished with 1,330 games played and 240 goals and 1,070 points. He won the Hart and Art Ross Trophies in 2010, and was a two-time NHL First Team All-Star. He holds five Canucks franchise records for assists (830), assists in a single season (83), most consecutive regular season games played (679), points in a single season (112), and is the team’s all-time leading scorer (1,070 points). Like Daniel, Henrik won gold at the 2006 Olympics and 2013 World Championship with Sweden.

Caroline Ouellette — The Canadian legend has a trophy case full of gold medals from the Olympics (4), World Championships (6, plus six silvers), and Four Nations Cup (8), along with four Clarkson Cup titles. Before she starred on the international stage, Ouellette dominated at Minnesota-Duluth finishing in the top-10 in all-time NCAA scoring with 229 points. She is also one of five athletes to win four straight Olympic gold medals and is a member of the women’s Triple Gold Club with wins at the Olympics, World Championships, and Clarkson Cup.

alexander mogilny
Mitchell Layton/Getty Images

THE PROBABLY-SHOULDS

Daniel Alfredsson – A veteran of 18 NHL seasons, he has an impressive resume and strong international credentials to make the cut. He scored 444 goals and recorded 1,157 points during his NHL career, and has a trophy cabinet that features Olympic gold and silver medals, the 1996 Calder Trophy, six NHL All-Star appearances, the King Clancy, and inclusion in the IIHF Hall of Fame.

Red Berenson (Builder Category) – After an NHL career that lasted 987 games and saw him win a Stanley Cup with the Canadiens, once score six goals in a game, and represent Canada at the famed 1972 Summit Series, Berenson went into coaching. After six seasons as an NHL coach with the Blues and Sabres, he left for the college game and was behind the bench for the University of Michigan until 2017. In those 33 years, he helped the program to a pair of national championships, 11 Frozen Four appearances and 11 conference titles. He won CCHA coach of the year twice, was the 2008 Spencer Penrose Award winner for top D-I coach, and going back to his NHL coaching days, was the 1981 winner of the Jack Adams Award.

Jennifer Botterill – Since the Hall regularly started inducting women a decade ago, there’s still plenty of catching up to do. Given the number of worthy candidates, there should be at least one or two women going in every year. Botterill has had a strong case for some time. A three-time Olympic gold medalist, she also helped Canada win five IIHF World Championship golds while averaging over a point per game in her international career (62 goals, 164 points, 162 games). Before starring on the international, Botterill was a two-time winner of the Patty Kazmeier Award, which recognizes the top women’s college player.

Herb Carnegie (Builder Category) – A successful career in the Quebec league’s of the 1940’s and 1950’s saw Carnegie as a frequent scorer and three-time Most Valuable Player. He could have been the first Black player in the NHL, even Willie O’Ree would tell you that. The Rangers offered him a minor league contract but Carnegie turned it down because it was for less money than he was being paid with the Sherbrooke St. Francis. When he hung up his skates he started the Future Aces hockey school and a foundation that gave out scholarships to kids across Canada.

Roberto Luongo — 489 wins (fourth all-time), gold at two Olympics and two IIHF World Championships, plus another at the World Cup of Hockey. Luongo didn’t win any major NHL awards outside of the Jennings Trophy, but he was up for the Hart and was a three-time Vezina Trophy finalist. He does have the numbers to make a case. Of the seven goaltenders who have appeared in at least 900 games, Luongo has the highest save percentage (.919); he’s top-10 in shutouts (77), and is one of three netminders to have started at least 1,000 games.

Alexander Mogilny – He was the first Soviet player to defect west and when he arrived he quickly made his mark. His 76-goal season in 1992-93 tied him for the NHL’s goal scoring lead with Teemu Selanne. He would finish with 127 points that season. A year later the Sabres named him the first European captain in league history. When it was all said and done, the six-time All-Star scored 473 goals and recorded 1,032 points. He’s a member of the IIHF’s Triple Gold Club after winning the Stanley Cup, Olympics and World Championships. He also helped the Soviet Union to gold at the World Junior Championship.

Viktor Tikhonov (Builder Category) – The head coach of the dominant “Red Machine” passed away in 2014 and is long overdue for induction for his influence on the game. Tikhonov, a 1998 IIHF Hall of Famer as a builder, led the Soviets to the 1981 Canada Cup, eight golds at the World Championships, two at the Olympics and another coaching the Unified Team at the 1992 Games. He also coached CSKA Moscow and led them to 12 straight league titles.

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THE POSSIBLES

Rod Brind’Amour — The Hurricanes head coach has seen his support grow since first becoming eligible in 2013. The 2019 induction of Guy Carbonneau could help Brind’Amour make it to Toronto. A two-way stalwart, he scored 452 goals and recorded 1,184 points in 1,484 NHL games. Along with the 2006 Stanley Cup, he also has two Selke Trophies to his name. You can argue his resume is better than Carbonneau’s. Finally, from the News and Observer’s Luke DeCock: “There are 36 players in NHL history who had 15 seasons with 49 or more points. Thirty-five of them are in the Hall of Fame. Want to guess who’s not?”

Boris Mikhailov – The long time Soviet captain had a decorated career playing for CSKA Moscow and representing his country. Domestically, Mikhailov scored 429 goals for CSKA and recorded 653 points, leading them to 11 Soviet League titles. On the international scene, the long time captain captured two Olympic golds and eight gold at the World Championships.  The support for international stars has grown with the inductions of Sergei Makarov (2016), Alexander Yakushev (2018), and Vaclav Nedomansky (2019). If not Mikhail this year, perhaps Vladimir Petrov? Sven Tumba? Alexander Maltsev?

Jeremy Roenick – 513 goals, 1,216 points, nine-time All-Star, silver medals at the Canada Cup and Olympic Games. Roenick’s elite level status only lasted for a few seasons in the early 1990s. After three-straight 100-point and 45-plus goal seasons, his production settled into the “very good” range in the mid-90s. Roenick did not win any individual hardware during his career, so even in classes where there appears to be an opening, the door might remain closed for him.

Henrik Zetterberg — A player who knew only one NHL franchise, Zetterberg walked away from the game in 2018 due to a degenerative back condition. He played all 1,082 games of his career with the Red Wings compiling 337 goals and 960 points while helping Detroit to a Stanley Cup title in 2008, where he also won the Conn Smythe Trophy. Zetterberg excelled with Sweden as well winning gold at the 2006 Olympics and World Championship.

patrik elias
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THE REST

Tom Barrasso – 369 wins, 38 shutouts, youngest goalie to win the Calder Trophy and youngest winner of the Vezina, 1985 Jennings Trophy, two-time Stanley Cup winner, 2002 Olympic silver medal.

Shane Doan — 1,540 games with the Jets/Coyotes franchise, 402 goals, 972 points, two World Championship gold medals, one World Cup of Hockey gold medal, two-time Memorial Cup winner, two-time NHL All-Star, King Clancy Trophy winner.

Patrik Elias – 408 goals, 1,025 points, 0.827 points per game, Olympic bronze, two World Championships bronze medals, two-time Stanley Cup winner, First Team NHL All-Star, nine 20-plus goal seasons.

Theo Fleury – 455 goals, 1,088 points, seven-time All-Star, gold at the World Junior Championship, Canada Cup and Olympics, silver at the World Championship and World Cup of Hockey, 1989 Stanley Cup winner. Here’s something in his favor, via TSN’S Steve Dryden: “Only 15 players in NHL history have averaged at least one point per game in both the regular season (min. 1,000 games) and playoffs (min. 75 games). Fourteen are in the HHOF.” That list includes Wayne Gretzky, Joe Sakic, Phil Esposito, Jean Beliveau, Gordie Howe, and Mark Messier.

Sergei Gonchar – 220 goals, 811 points, five-time All-Star, 2009 Stanley Cup title (two more as an assistant coach), silver and bronze medals from the Olympics and IIHF World Championship, eight 50-plus point seasons, five straight seasons with at least 18 goals.

Milan Hejduk – 375 goals, 805 points, Olympic gold, a Stanley Cup, a Rocket Richard Trophy, a five-time 30-goal scorer.

Curtis Joseph – 454 wins, 51 shutouts, an Olympic gold medal, three-time NHL All-Star. A three-time Vezina Trophy finalist, CuJo had himself a fine career, but did not win a Stanley Cup or any individual hardware. Is he Hall of Fame worthy or perfectly fit for the Hall of Very Good? Only seven goalies have been inducted into the Hall since 1990 via the player category.

Steve Larmer – 441 goals, 1,012 points, 1983 Calder Trophy, two-time All-Star, 1991 Canada Cup gold, 1994 Stanley Cup title, owns sixth-longest consecutive games streak in NHL history.

Vincent Lecavalier – 421 goals, 949 points, 2004 World Cup of Hockey gold and MVP, 2004 Stanley Cup, 2007 Rocket Richard Trophy, 2008 King Clancy Trophy, four-time NHL All-Star. It’s not quite the trophy case of 2018 inductee Martin St. Louis, so that could probably leave Lecavalier stuck in the Hall of Very Good.

Jere Lehtinen – 243 goals, 514 points, three-time Selke Trophy winner (as a winger), one Stanley Cup, World Championship gold and three silvers, one Olympic silver, three Olympic bronze medals, one World Cup of Hockey silver, IIHF Hall of Fame inductee.

Rick Nash – 437 goals, 805 points, gold with Canada at two Olympics and the 2007 World Championships. He shared the 2004 Rocket Richard Trophy with Jarome Iginla and llya Kovalchuk and provided us with one of the goals of the century:

Markus Näslund – 395 goals, 869 points, 0.97 points peer game, Hart Trophy runner-up and Lester Pearson Award winner (2003), three-time First Team All-Star.

Kent Nilsson – 262 goals, 686 points, two-time NHL All-Star, 1987 Stanley Cup title, 1978 WHA rookie of the year, two-time WHA champion, IIHF Hall of Famer, Canada Cup and IIHF World Championship silver medals with Sweden.

Chris Osgood – 401 wins, 50 shutouts, three-time Stanley Cup champion, two-time Jennings Trophy winner.  A good goalie on some great Red Wings teams for a long time. How much has that hurt his candidacy?

Tim Thomas – A late bloomer, Thomas came to the Bruins in 2005 and eventually took over as the team’s No. 1 netminder. He would help them to the 2010-11 Stanley Cup title and win the Conn Smythe Trophy. He would also go on to win the Vezina Trophy twice; become a two-time First Team All-Star; and share the Jennings Trophy with Manny Fernandez. Thomas became the first goalie since Bernie Parent to win the Vezina, Stanley Cup, and Conn Smythe in the same season.

Keith Tkachuk – 538 goals, 1,065 points, 1996 World Cup of Hockey champion, Olympic silver medal. He’s 33rd on the NHL’s all-time goals list. Only three players ahead of him are not in the Hall of Fame; but Alex Ovechkin and Jaromir Jagr will end up there. Maybe Patrick Marleau, too. Like Roenick, Tkachuk’s numbers are good, but he’s in a range where there are a handful of players with similar stats. While Joe Mullen’s inclusion may help Tkachuk or Roenick at some point in time, right now, he’s just on the outside.

Meghan Duggan
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WOMEN’S CATEGORY

Karyn Bye-Dietz – She was part of the gold medal winning U.S. team at the 1998 Olympics and took home silver at the 2002 Games and six World Championships. During the ’98 Olympics, Bye-Dietz led the Americans with five goals and eight points and finished her international career with 84 points in 51 games. In 2011 she was only the fifth woman to be inducted into the IIHF Hall of Fame, and in 2014 was named to the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame.

Natalie Darwitz – Before her decorated international career with the U.S., Darwitz excelled on the collegiate stage as a three-time All-American and three-time Patty Kazmeier Memorial Award finalist at Minnesota. She dominated with the Golden Gophers scoring 102 goals and 246 points over three seasons, helping them to back-to-back national titles. Representing her country, Darwitz would help the Americans to two Olympic silver medals and bronze; three golds and five silvers at the World Championship; and two golds and eight silvers at the 4 Nations Cup.

Meghan Duggan – A seven-time gold medalist at the World Championships, Duggan was also part for the U.S. squad that took home gold at the 2018 Olympics in Pyeongchang. The American legend was also a Clarkson Cup winner with the Boston Blades in 2015 and was voted the 2011 Patty Kazmaier Memorial Award winner for her play at the University of Wisconsin. During her collegiate career she titled 108 goals and 238 points in 159 games.

Jenny Potter – Having won gold at the Olympics (1998), World Championships (four times) and the Four Nations Cup (2011), Potter is part of the women’s Triple Gold Club, which includes a Clarkson Cup conquest. Before going pro, she recorded 327 points in 134 games with the University of Minnesota-Duluth as a four-time All-American. With Team USA, Potter scored 23 goals and posted 64 points at the IIHF Women’s World Championship and 11 goals and 30 points in four Olympics.

Maria Rooth – A 2015 IIHF Hall of Famer, the forward represented Finland at the Olympic four times, taking home silver and bronze. She played 265 times for Sweden and finished with 105 goals. Before her international career, Rooth played at Minnesota Duluth where she ended her collegiate career with three NCAA titles, was the second-leading scorer in school history (119 goals, 232 points) and a three-time All-American. She’s also the only woman to have her number retired in the history of the program.

BUILDER CATEGORY

Ken Hitchcock – His coaching resume lists 849 wins (fourth all-time), one Stanley Cup title, and numerous players thankful for his influence and teams who were improved with him behind their bench. He’s also owner of a HOF-worthy sweatshirt.

Mike Keenan – Whether it was his quick hook with goalies or clashing with his players, there was never a dull moment when “Iron Mike” was coaching your team. But he also did win 672 NHL games and the 1985 Jack Adams Award. His teams won four conference titles and he helped lead the Rangers to the Stanley Cup in 1994, ending their 54-year drought. He also won in Russia, guiding Metallurg Magnitogorsk to the 2014 Gagarin Cup title, making him the first North American coach to win the KHL championship and the first coach to win both the Gagarin Cup and the Stanley Cup. Keenan’s championships also include the 1983 AHL Calder Cup and two Canada Cups, including the legendary 1987 tournament.

Bryan Murray – He compiled 620 wins as a head coach for five teams over 17 NHL seasons and made the Stanley Cup Playoffs 12 times in 13 full seasons behind a bench. He won the Jack Adams Award in 1984 and was named NHL Executive of the Year after building the 1995-96 Panthers team that reached the Cup Final.

Marguerite Norris – Following her dad’s death in 1952 she became the NHL’s first female executive and later was the first woman to have her name on the Stanley Cup after the Red Wings’ won in 1954. In Jen Conway’s case for Norris in 2017, she wrote, “The Red Wings became a more profitable team under her care, and she tried to convince the other owners that televised games were the future. She also advocated for arenas to be more female-friendly and for the farm team system then in place be revamped to be more equitable and fair to all the teams.”

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.