NHL free agency tracker 2022: Full list of offseason signings

It’s time for NHL Free Agency! The offseason is under way and with the market opening July 13 there will be plenty of action this summer. Some teams have already been busy getting their 2022-23 rosters in order. Check back here for all of the signings that teams will be making in hopes of improving their chances at winning the 2023 Stanley Cup.

NHL Free Agency Signings

July 2

• Blue Jackets sign Carson Meyer to a one-year, $750,000 deal

July 1

• Canucks sign Brock Boeser to three-year, $19.95 million deal (link)
• Blue Jackets sign Josh Dunne to a one-year, $874,125 deal
• Canucks sign Jack Rathbone to a two-year, $1.7 million deal
• Canucks sign Noah Juulsen to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Canucks sign William Lockwood to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Kings sign Frédéric Allard to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Lightning signs Nick Paul to a seven-year, $22.05 million deal
• Rangers sign Julien Gauthier to a one-year, $800,000 deal

June 30

• Kings sign Matt Villalta to a one year, $787,500 deal
• Kraken signs Gustav Olofsson to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Sabres sign Craig Anderson to a one-year, $2 million deal
• Stars sign Riley Tufte to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Stars sign Scott Wedgewood to a two-year, $2 million deal

June 29

• Kings sign Kevin Fiala to a seven-year, $55.125 million deal (link)
• Lightning signs Darren Raddysh to a two-year, $1,525,000 deal
• Sabres sign Sean Malone to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Stars sign Ryan Shea to a one-year, $750,000 deal

June 28

• Stars sign Joseph Cecconi to a one-year, $750,000 deal

June 27

• Canucks sign Sheldone Dries to a two-year, $1,525,000 deal
• Canucks sign John Stevens to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Canucks sign Guillaume Brisebois to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Maple Leafs sign Timothy Liljegren to a two-year, $2.8 million deal
• Panthers sign Matt Kiersted to a two-year, $1,525,000 deal

NHL free agency tracker 2022: Full list of offseason signings

It’s time for NHL Free Agency! The offseason is under way and with the market opening July 13 there will be plenty of action this summer. Some teams have already been busy getting their 2022-23 rosters in order. Check back here for all of the signings that teams will be making in hopes of improving their chances at winning the 2023 Stanley Cup.

NHL Free Agency Signings

July 2

• Blue Jackets sign Carson Meyer to a one-year, $750,000 deal

July 1

• Canucks sign Brock Boeser to three-year, $19.95 million deal (link)
• Blue Jackets sign Josh Dunne to a one-year, $874,125 deal
• Canucks sign Jack Rathbone to a two-year, $1.7 million deal
• Canucks sign Noah Juulsen to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Canucks sign William Lockwood to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Kings sign Frédéric Allard to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Lightning signs Nick Paul to a seven-year, $22.05 million deal
• Rangers sign Julien Gauthier to a one-year, $800,000 deal

June 30

• Kings sign Matt Villalta to a one year, $787,500 deal
• Kraken signs Gustav Olofsson to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Sabres sign Craig Anderson to a one-year, $2 million deal
• Stars sign Riley Tufte to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Stars sign Scott Wedgewood to a two-year, $2 million deal

June 29

• Kings sign Kevin Fiala to a seven-year, $55.125 million deal (link)
• Lightning signs Darren Raddysh to a two-year, $1,525,000 deal
• Sabres sign Sean Malone to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Stars sign Ryan Shea to a one-year, $750,000 deal

June 28

• Stars sign Joseph Cecconi to a one-year, $750,000 deal

June 27

• Canucks sign Sheldone Dries to a two-year, $1,525,000 deal
• Canucks sign John Stevens to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Canucks sign Guillaume Brisebois to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Maple Leafs sign Timothy Liljegren to a two-year, $2.8 million deal
• Panthers sign Matt Kiersted to a two-year, $1,525,000 deal

NHL free agency tracker 2022: Full list of offseason signings

It’s time for NHL Free Agency! The offseason is under way and with the market opening July 13 there will be plenty of action this summer. Some teams have already been busy getting their 2022-23 rosters in order. Check back here for all of the signings that teams will be making in hopes of improving their chances at winning the 2023 Stanley Cup.

NHL Free Agency Signings

July 2

• Blue Jackets sign Carson Meyer to a one-year, $750,000 deal

July 1

• Canucks sign Brock Boeser to three-year, $19.95 million deal (link)
• Blue Jackets sign Josh Dunne to a one-year, $874,125 deal
• Canucks sign Jack Rathbone to a two-year, $1.7 million deal
• Canucks sign Noah Juulsen to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Canucks sign William Lockwood to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Kings sign Frédéric Allard to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Lightning signs Nick Paul to a seven-year, $22.05 million deal
• Rangers sign Julien Gauthier to a one-year, $800,000 deal

June 30

• Kings sign Matt Villalta to a one year, $787,500 deal
• Kraken signs Gustav Olofsson to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Sabres sign Craig Anderson to a one-year, $2 million deal
• Stars sign Riley Tufte to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Stars sign Scott Wedgewood to a two-year, $2 million deal

June 29

• Kings sign Kevin Fiala to a seven-year, $55.125 million deal (link)
• Lightning signs Darren Raddysh to a two-year, $1,525,000 deal
• Sabres sign Sean Malone to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Stars sign Ryan Shea to a one-year, $750,000 deal

June 28

• Stars sign Joseph Cecconi to a one-year, $750,000 deal

June 27

• Canucks sign Sheldone Dries to a two-year, $1,525,000 deal
• Canucks sign John Stevens to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Canucks sign Guillaume Brisebois to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Maple Leafs sign Timothy Liljegren to a two-year, $2.8 million deal
• Panthers sign Matt Kiersted to a two-year, $1,525,000 deal

NHL free agency tracker 2022: Full list of offseason signings

It’s time for NHL Free Agency! The offseason is under way and with the market opening July 13 there will be plenty of action this summer. Some teams have already been busy getting their 2022-23 rosters in order. Check back here for all of the signings that teams will be making in hopes of improving their chances at winning the 2023 Stanley Cup.

NHL Free Agency Signings

July 1

• Canucks sign Brock Boeser to three-year, $19.95 million deal (link)
• Blue Jackets sign Josh Dunne to a one-year, $874,125 deal
• Canucks sign Jack Rathbone to a two-year, $1.7 million deal
• Canucks sign Noah Juulsen to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Canucks sign William Lockwood to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Kings sign Frédéric Allard to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Lightning signs Nick Paul to a seven-year, $22.05 million deal
• Rangers sign Julien Gauthier to a one-year, $800,000 deal

June 30

• Kings sign Matt Villalta to a one year, $787,500 deal
• Kraken signs Gustav Olofsson to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Sabres sign Craig Anderson to a one-year, $2 million deal
• Stars sign Riley Tufte to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Stars sign Scott Wedgewood to a two-year, $2 million deal

June 29

• Kings sign Kevin Fiala to a seven-year, $55.125 million deal (link)
• Lightning signs Darren Raddysh to a two-year, $1,525,000 deal
• Sabres sign Sean Malone to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Stars sign Ryan Shea to a one-year, $750,000 deal

June 28

• Stars sign Joseph Cecconi to a one-year, $750,000 deal

June 27

• Canucks sign Sheldone Dries to a two-year, $1,525,000 deal
• Canucks sign John Stevens to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Canucks sign Guillaume Brisebois to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Maple Leafs sign Timothy Liljegren to a two-year, $2.8 million deal
• Panthers sign Matt Kiersted to a two-year, $1,525,000 deal

Boughner out as Sharks head coach as ‘reset’ continues

The San Jose Sharks aren’t just looking for a new GM; they also need a new head coach. The Sharks fired head coach Bob Boughner as part of sweeping changes to its coaching staff.

Along with Boughner, the Sharks fired assistants John Madden and John MacLean, while also firing video coach Dan Darrow.

Sharks will let next GM hire new head coach after firing Bob Boughner

Interim Sharks GM Joe Will explained that the team wanted to give their next GM “full autonomy” when it comes to their coaching staff.

“As we progress through our search for the next general manager of the Sharks following 19 seasons under Doug Wilson’s leadership, it has become apparent that the organization is in the process of an evolution,” Will said in the team’s release. “The bottom line is we have missed the playoffs for the past three seasons, which isn’t acceptable to our owner, our organization, or to our fans. As part of this evolution and evaluation, we felt it was in the best interest of the club to allow the next Sharks general manager to have full autonomy related to the make-up of the on-ice coaching staff moving ahead.

One interesting additional line from Will was:

” … This change is not an indictment of their performance as much as it is a recognition of the complete organizational reset …”

It’s fair to wonder about Bob Boughner’s coaching future, though. After failing to make the playoffs during a two-season run with the Panthers, he also never coached a playoff game with an expensive Sharks team.

How much of the Sharks’ failures were really Boughner’s fault? That’s a difficult question to answer. But it’s easy to say that the team performed poorly during his run.

Could ‘complete organizational reset’ mean a Sharks rebuild?

How primed, really, are the Sharks for a true “complete organizational reset,” though?

Instead of making the sober (if painful) decision to trade Tomas Hertl, the Sharks signed him to a risky extension ($8.1375M cap hit through 2029-30).

The Sharks’ salary structure is saddled with some truly troubling deals. Marc-Edouard Vlasic is a perennial buyout candidate. Brent Burns is somehow already 37, and his $8M cap hit lasts for three more seasons. Erik Karlsson rebounded last season, yet there’s still a lot of distance between rebounding and being worth $11.5M per year. Logan Couture‘s contract and age are both sneaky-troubling.

If Hertl ends up aging poorly, well … add another bad contract to a huge heap. (That heap also includes the dead money of a Martin Jones buyout.)

A new GM would face a massive challenge. That’s especially true if the organization continues to be in rebuild-denial.

[What went wrong for the 2021-22 Sharks]

What do you do, for instance, with Timo Meier? He’s in a similar spot to where Hertl was. Meier, 25, enters a contract year with a $6M cap hit. He’s a pending RFA who would have salary arbitration rights.

Considering the direction of the Sharks, you’d think the play would be to trade Meier (as painful as that would be). Yet, following your history, the actual path might be to extend his contract and just hope that things work out, team-wide, when they haven’t been for years.

Whoever takes over as Sharks GM will need a big boat of ideas. Finding the right replacement for Sharks head coach with Boughner out would just be part of the equation.

With the 2022 NHL Draft drawing near, it would behoove the Sharks to actually pick that new GM soon, by the way.

NHL free agency tracker 2022: Full list of offseason signings

It’s time for NHL Free Agency! The offseason is under way and with the market opening July 13 there will be plenty of action this summer. Some teams have already been busy getting their 2022-23 rosters in order. Check back here for all of the signings that teams will be making in hopes of improving their chances at winning the 2023 Stanley Cup.

NHL Free Agency Signings

July 1

• Lightning signs Nick Paul to a seven-year, $22.05 million deal

June 30

• Kings sign Matt Villalta to a one year, $787,500 deal
• Kraken signs Gustav Olofsson to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Sabres sign Craig Anderson to a one-year, $2 million deal
• Stars sign Riley Tufte to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Stars sign Scott Wedgewood to a two-year, $2 million deal

June 29

• Kings sign Kevin Fiala to a seven-year, $55.125 million deal (link)
• Lightning signs Darren Raddysh to a two-year, $1,525,000 deal
• Sabres sign Sean Malone to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Stars sign Ryan Shea to a one-year, $750,000 deal

June 28

• Stars sign Joseph Cecconi to a one-year, $750,000 deal

June 27

• Canucks sign Sheldone Dries to a two-year, $1,525,000 deal
• Canucks sign John Stevens to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Canucks sign Guillaume Brisebois to a one-year, $750,000 deal
• Maple Leafs sign Timothy Liljegren to a two-year, $2.8 million deal
• Panthers sign Matt Kiersted to a two-year, $1,525,000 deal

PHT Morning Skate: Puljujärvi’s future; NHL offer sheet targets

Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from the NHL and around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.

• As every day passes, it’s more and more likely that Jesse Puljujärvi will be playing somewhere other than Edmonton next season. [Oilers Nation]

• Could Martin Nečas and Jake Oettinger be prime offers sheet targets this summer? [Daily Faceoff]

• Blackhawks GM Kyle Davidson is not ruling out trading Alex DeBrincat. What sort of package could he deliver? [NHL.com]

• Now that Kevin Fiala is gone, what comes next for the Wild and will they be able to put up a fight in the Central Division? [Zone Coverage]

• Herb Carnegie’s daughter, Bernice, on the pride her family feels after learning of the news her dad will be inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame. [TSN]

• How the Muslim community is reveling in Nazem Kadri‘s Stanley Cup conquest with the Avalanche. [Sportsnet]

• Lightning assistants Derek Lalonde and Jeff Halpern are on Steve Yzerman’s radar as the Red Wings continue their head coaching search. [MLive]

• The QMJHL’s Saint John Sea Dogs won the Memorial Cup Wednesday night over the Hamilton Bulldogs. [Watertown Daily Times]

• The Toronto Maple Leafs announced Wednesday that Jim Pappin, who scored the winning goal in the 1967 Stanley Cup final, has died at age 82. [CBC]

• Where it all went wrong for the Jets and what happens next? [NBC Sports Edge]

• On Ron Hextall’s tenure so far in Pittsburgh: “Just based on nothing more than historical track record here and moves we have actually seen get made in Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, Hextall seems incredibly risk averse. He seems more fearful of a deal going wrong and the potential downside of a significant trade or signing than the potential reward that could come from such a deal. That might explain why Rust’s contract got done before Evgeni Malkin or Kris Letang. Or why he was so quick to re-sign Carter.” [Pensburgh]

• Toronto Six goaltender Carly Jackson is just getting started and is eyeing an Isobel Cup. [The Ice Garden]

————

Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

PHT Morning Skate: World Juniors schedule released; Rangers’ options at center

Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from the NHL and around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.

• The updated 2022 World Junior Championship schedule is out with the tournament beginning August 9 in Edmonton. In December, the tournament was canceled days after it started due to COVID-19. [IIHF]

• “Scotiabank announced on Tuesday that it is pausing its sponsorship of Hockey Canada in the wake of sexual assault allegations that came to light last month, sparking a number of other sponsors to follow suit while demanding change.” [Sportsnet]

• What options at center could Rangers GM Chris Drury explore this summer? [LoHud]

• The Lightning are firm believers their Cup contending days are not over. [TSN]

• Why Islanders defenseman Noah Dobson is a prime offer sheet target. [Hockey Tactics]

• Important dates to know on the NHL off-season calendar. [Raw Charge]

• Looking back at the 2012 NHL Draft and how it all went wrong for the top four picks. [Daily Faceoff]

• “The National Hockey League has secured a long-term apparel and headwear licensing agreement with premium lifestyle sportswear and culture brand Mitchell & Ness. The company will gain the rights to design and manufacture officially-licensed lifestyle apparel, headwear and accessories for the NHL and all 32 NHL teams.” [Sports Business]

• John Stevens joins Bruce Cassidy’s bench in Vegas while Sean Burke is the Golden Knights’ director of goaltending. [Golden Knights]

————

Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs 2022 schedule, TV info

The 2022 Stanley Cup Final featured the Colorado Avalanche and Tampa Bay Lightning, with the Avalanche winning the series in six games.

In the Eastern Conference Final, the Lightning dispatched the New York Rangers in six games as they will now vie for their third consecutive title. The Avalanche swept the Edmonton Oilers in the Western Conference Final and are playing in the Stanley Cup Final for the first time since 2001.

In the Cup Final, the Avalanche won the first two games before the Lightning made it a series by taking Game 3. The teams traded wins in Games 4 and 5, setting the stage for Colorado to win its third championship in franchise history and first since the 2000-01 NHL season.

2022 NHL playoff schedule: Stanley Cup Final

COLORADO AVALANCHE v. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING (COL wins series 4-2)

Game 1 – Avalanche 4, Lightning 3 (OT)
Game 2 – Avalanche 7, Lightning 0
Game 3 – Lightning 6, Avalanche 2
Game 4 – Avalanche 3, Lightning 2 (OT)
Game 5 – Lightning 3, Avalanche 2
Game 6 – Avalanche 2, Lightning 1

2022 NHL playoff schedule: Eastern Conference Final

NEW YORK RANGERS v. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING (TB wins series 4-2)

Game 1 – Rangers 6, Lightning 2
Game 2 – Rangers 3, Lightning 2
Game 3 – Lightning 3, Rangers 2
Game 4 – Lightning 4, Rangers 1
Game 5 – Lightning 3, Rangers 1
Game 6 – Lightning 2, Rangers 1

2022 NHL playoff schedule: Western Conference Final

EDMONTON OILERS v. COLORADO AVALANCHE (COL wins series 4-0)
Game 1 – Avalanche 8, Oilers 6
Game 2 – Avalanche 4, Oilers 0
Game 3 – Avalanche 4, Oilers 2
Game 4 – Avalanche 6, Oilers 5 (OT)

2022 NHL playoff schedule: Second Round – Eastern Conference

NEW YORK RANGERS v. CAROLINA HURRICANES (NYR wins series 4-3)
Game 1 – Hurricanes 2, Rangers 1 (OT)
Game 2 – Hurricanes 2, Rangers 0
Game 3 – Rangers 3, Hurricanes 1
Game 4 – Rangers 4, Hurricanes 1
Game 5 – Hurricanes 3, Rangers 1
Game 6 – Rangers 5, Hurricanes 2
Game 7 – Rangers 6, Hurricanes 2

FLORIDA PANTHERS v. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING (TB wins series 4-0)

Game 1 – Lightning 4, Panthers 1
Game 2 – Lightning 2, Panthers 1
Game 3 – Lightning 5, Panthers 1
Game 4 – Lightning 2, Panthers 0

2022 NHL playoff schedule: Second Round – Western Conference

COLORADO AVALANCHE v. ST. LOUIS BLUES (COL wins series 4-2)
Game 1 – Avalanche 3, Blues 2 (OT)
Game 2 – Blues 4, Avalanche 1
Game 3 – Avalanche 5, Blues 2
Game 4 – Avalanche 6, Blues 3
Game 5 – Blues 5, Avalanche 4 (OT)
Game 6 – Avalanche 3, Blues 2

CALGARY FLAMES v. EDMONTON OILERS (EDM wins series 4-1)
Game 1 –
Flames 9, Oilers 6
Game 2 – Oilers 5, Flames 3
Game 3 – Oilers 4, Flames 1
Game 4 – Oilers 5, Flames 3
Game 5 – Oilers 5, Flames 4 (OT)

First Round – Eastern Conference

FLORIDA PANTHERS v. WASHINGTON CAPITALS (FLA wins series 4-2)
Game 1: Capitals 4, Panthers 2
Game 2: Panthers 5, Capitals 1
Game 3: Capitals 6, Panthers 1
Game 4: Panthers 3, Capitals 2 (OT)
Game 5: Panthers 5, Capitals 3
Game 6: Panthers 4, Capitals 3 (OT)

CAROLINA HURRICANES v. BOSTON BRUINS (CAR wins series 4-3)
Game 1: Hurricanes 5, Bruins 1
Game 2: Hurricanes 5, Bruins 2
Game 3: Bruins 4, Hurricanes 2
Game 4: Bruins 5, Hurricanes 2
Game 5: Hurricanes 5, Bruins 1
Game 6: Bruins 5, Hurricanes 2
Game 7: Hurricanes 3, Bruins 2

TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS v. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING (TBL wins series 4-3)
Game 1: Maple Leafs 5, Lightning 0
Game 2: Lightning 5, Maple Leafs 3
Game 3: Maple Leafs 5, Lightning 2
Game 4: Lightning 7, Maple Leafs 3
Game 5: Maple Leafs 4, Lightning 3
Game 6: Lightning 4, Maple Leafs 3 (OT)
Game 7: Lightning 2, Maple Leafs 1

NEW YORK RANGERS v. PITTSBURGH PENGUINS (NYR wins series 4-3)
Game 1: Penguins 4, Rangers 3 (3OT)
Game 2: Rangers 5, Penguins 2
Game 3: Penguins 7, Rangers 4
Game 4: Penguins 7, Rangers 2
Game 5: Rangers 5, Penguins 3
Game 6: Rangers 5, Penguins 3
Game 7: Rangers 4, Penguins 3 (OT)

First Round – Western Conference

COLORADO AVALANCHE v. NASHVILLE PREDATORS (COL wins series 4-0)
Game 1: Avalanche 7, Predators 2
Game 2: Avalanche 2, Predators 1 (OT)
Game 3: Avalanche 7, Predators 3
Game 4: Avalanche 5, Predators 3

CALGARY FLAMES v. DALLAS STARS (CGY wins series 4-3)
Game 1: Flames 1, Stars 0
Game 2: Stars 2, Flames 0
Game 3: Stars 4, Flames 2
Game 4: Flames 4, Stars 1
Game 5: Flames 3, Stars 1
Game 6: Stars 4, Flames 2
Game 7: Flames 3, Stars 2 (OT)

EDMONTON OILERS vs. LOS ANGELES KINGS (EDM win series 4-3)
Game 1: Kings 4, Oilers 3
Game 2: Oilers 6, Kings 0
Game 3: Oilers 8, Kings 2
Game 4: Kings 4, Oilers 0
Game 5: Kings 5, Oilers 4 (OT)
Game 6: Oilers 4, Kings 2
Game 7: Oilers 2, Kings 0

MINNESOTA WILD v. ST. LOUIS BLUES (STL wins series 4-2)
Game 1: Blues 4, Wild 0
Game 2: Wild 6, Blues 2
Game 3: Wild 5, Blues 1
Game 4: Blues 5, Wild 2
Game 5: Blues 5, Wild 2
Game 6: Blues 5, Wild 1

PHT Morning Skate: MacKinnon’s influence on Avs; Dumba’s future with Wild

Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from the NHL and around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.

• Great story on Nathan MacKinnon‘s influence on the Stanley Cup champion Avalanche. [ESPN]

• How the Avalanche and Lightning helped build their Stanley Cup teams via the trade route. [TSN]

• What is Matt Dumba‘s future in Minnesota? [Zone Coverage]

• Daniel Alfredsson, Herb Carnegie, Roberto Luongo, Riikka Sallinen, and Daniel and Henrik Sedin will make up the Hockey Hall of Fame’s Class of 2022. [PHT]

• “Though Ottawa is his permanent home, Alfredsson is in Sweden at the moment and when he hadn’t heard anything by early evening Swedish time, he assumed this was not going to be his year – again. He and his family, plus friends, were in the backyard and it started to rain, so they had just gone inside to get out of the weather when the phone rang.” [Sportsnet]

• The case for Shane Wright to go No. 1 overall in next week’s NHL Draft. [NHL.com]

• What do you think about the “RoboPen” Penguins logo and should the team bring it back? [Pensburgh]

• A look at what happened to the Islanders this season. [NBC Sports Edge]

• Fun read on what players need to do to get ready for their summer vacation. [Daily Faceoff]

• Despite getting up in age, Brent Burns can still provide value for the Sharks. [NBC Sports Bay Area]

————

Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.