Lightning bury Maple Leafs early in Game 4 to even series

Sheldon Keefe said Sunday morning his team had yet to produce its best hockey this spring.

Toronto’s head coach is still waiting.

Steven Stamkos scored one minute into the first period to spark an early barrage as the Tampa Bay Lightning steamrolled the Maple Leafs 7-3 to knot their first-round playoff series 2-2.

“We weren’t at the required level,” Keefe said following an embarrassing no-show. “Tampa played at a higher level than us and got rewarded for it.”

Ross Colton, with a pair, Pierre-Edouard Bellemare, Pat Maroon, Corey Perry and Ondrej Palat had the other goals for the two-time defending Stanley Cup champions. Nikita Kucherov and Brandon Hagel added two assists each for the Lightning, who led 3-0 inside the first eight minutes inside a raucous Amalie Arena.

“We had a great start,” Stamkos said. “That was one of our keys, to come out and play the right way.”

WATCH l Leafs fall to Lightning in Game 4:

Ross Colton leads the way as Lightning even up series with Leafs

10 hours ago

Duration 1:31

A pair of goals by Ross Colton lifts Tampa Bay to a 7-3 win over Toronto, evening the series at 2-2. 1:31

Andrei Vasilevskiy stopped 22 shots, improving to an eye-popping 16-0 in the last three post-seasons following a loss.

Tampa carried its dominant performance to close out Friday’s 5-2 defeat — Toronto scored two late empty-netters — into Game 4.

“We talked about finding some success there in the third period and wanting to replicate that,” Stamkos added. “Guys took it to heart.”

William Nylander scored twice for Toronto, while Jake Muzzin also beat Vasilevskiy with the game out of reach.

Jack Campbell allowed five goals on 16 shots before being pulled in favour of Erik Kallgren for the Leafs, who came out flat on a night they could have grabbed a 3-1 stranglehold in the best-of-seven matchup. Kallgren finished with 10 saves.

“It’s disappointing,” Muzzin said. “We battled hard the other night to be in the position we were in. We knew they were gonna come hard.

“Just weren’t ready for it.”

Leafs goalie Jack Campbell reacts after giving up a goal to Corey Perry during the second period on Sunday night. (Chris O’Meara/The Associated Press)

Toronto has taken an NHL-high 32 penalties through four contests, with the Lightning having connected on the power play five times, including once on Sunday.

“We’ve done a pretty good job of, for the most part, not getting involved in the stuff not in between the whistles,” Leafs captain John Tavares said. “But some of the obstruction is getting called tighter than probably we’ve been used to in the past.

“Something we have to adapt to.”

‘It’s one game’

The series now shifts to Scotiabank Arena for Tuesday’s Game 5, while Game 6 goes Thursday back at Amalie Arena. Game 7, if necessary, is scheduled for Saturday in Toronto.

“Scored on their first shot and took it to us, but it’s one game,” said Campbell, who’s allowed 12 goals in his last 145 minutes 25 seconds of action against the Lightning.

“Learn from it, be ready for the next one.”

Looking to get more out of a top line that was largely neutralized in Game 3 by Anthony Cirelli, Brayden Point and Alex Killorn with Tampa getting the last change, Keefe moved Alexander Kerfoot into Michael Bunting’s spot on the wing alongside Auston Matthews and Mitch Marner to begin the game.

But Toronto, which finished the regular season with 115 points, five clear of the Lightning for second in the Atlantic Division, started its third line and third defence pair, and was on the back foot from the drop of the puck as Tampa’s top units came in waves against a skittish opponent.

The Leafs hadn’t even crossed centre when Stamkos — robbed by Campbell on a late one-timer in Game 3 — blasted another of his patented bullets a minute into the first to blow the roof off the sold-out rink after Toronto defenceman Justin Holl couldn’t clear the zone.

“They came out hard and we didn’t execute,” Tavares said. “We have to do a better job of being on our toes and being ready for that.

“We knew it was coming.”

NHL linesman Mark Shewchyk gets in between Maple Leafs forward William Nylander, right, and Lightning defenceman Cal Foote during the third period. (Chris O’Meara/The Associated Press)

The listless visitors went down 2-0 at 5:20 when Muzzin and Campbell couldn’t control a puck down low that popped out to Bellemare in the slot.

Tampa made it 3-0 as the onslaught continued with a second fourth-line goal when Maroon jumped on another miscue by a Toronto defender — Morgan Rielly was the culprit this time — and poked home his own rebound at 7:58 after Campbell made a terrific pad stop.

Vasilevskiy didn’t have much to do at the other end with the shots sitting at 8-1, but was put to work late in the period as Toronto started to finally show a little life.

Matthews fired a wicked backhand off the crossbar before last season’s Conn Smythe Trophy winner as playoff MVP had to be sharp on a deflection down low.

But the Lightning put any thought of a comeback to bed at 3:17 of the middle period when Colton’s snapshot went off Campbell’s glove for the centre’s second goal in as many games.

Tampa followed that up with a Perry goal that made it 5-0 — the third from a Lightning fourth-liner — on a long 5-on-3 man advantage at 5:25 after Tavares was whistled for hooking and David Kampf fired the puck out of play nine seconds later for a delay-of-game call.

Campbell stayed in the game for a couple more minutes only to be pulled in favour of Kallgren following a TV timeout after a long chat with Keefe at the bench.

“I always want to battle,” said the goaltender. “But I always respect the coach’s decision.”

“I know he’s going to continue to battle,” Keefe added. “I just made it clear to him it’s obviously a long way to come back and we need him to be good to go for the next game.”

Leafs’ Jack Campbell stops a shot from Brayden Point during the second period. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)

Nylander got Toronto on the board with a goal on the man advantage at 2:27 of the third to spoil Vasilevskiy’s bid for the seventh playoff shutout of his career before adding his second of the playoffs with the teams skating 4 on 4 at 12:05.

The Leafs pulled Kallgren with under six minutes left in regulation, but Palat scored in into an empty net before Muzzin found the back of the net at 15:41 to make it 6-3.

But Colton added his second into another empty net to seal it.

Toronto hasn’t won a playoff round since 2004 — before the NHL instituted a salary cap and two lockouts ago — and is looking to take a step towards ending a Cup drought dating back 54 years following a string of post-season failures.

Toronto fans gathered around the team’s tunnel leading to the ice surface and started “Go Leafs Go” chants half an hour before warmups.

Tampa’s game operations crew, meanwhile, trolled the visitors by showing a “1967” sign on the rink’s massive scoreboard ahead of the opening faceoff before the Lightning imposed their will early and often.

‘We’ll be better next time’

“We got the split,” Keefe said in trying to take a positive out of Sunday’s disaster. “It was a best-of-five with three games in this building and two at home. Now it’s best-of-three with two in our building. It’s a successful road trip in that sense. Whether you lose the game 2-1 or in the manner that we did tonight, it doesn’t matter.

“You wash it, you move on. We’ll be better next time.”

If not, the Leafs will face another hostile environment Thursday

Lightning bury Maple Leafs early in Game 4 to even series

Sheldon Keefe said Sunday morning his team had yet to produce its best hockey this spring.

Toronto’s head coach is still waiting.

Steven Stamkos scored one minute into the first period to spark an early barrage as the Tampa Bay Lightning steamrolled the Maple Leafs 7-3 to knot their first-round playoff series 2-2.

“We weren’t at the required level,” Keefe said following an embarrassing no-show. “Tampa played at a higher level than us and got rewarded for it.”

Ross Colton, with a pair, Pierre-Edouard Bellemare, Pat Maroon, Corey Perry and Ondrej Palat had the other goals for the two-time defending Stanley Cup champions. Nikita Kucherov and Brandon Hagel added two assists each for the Lightning, who led 3-0 inside the first eight minutes inside a raucous Amalie Arena.

“We had a great start,” Stamkos said. “That was one of our keys, to come out and play the right way.”

WATCH l Leafs fall to Lightning in Game 4:

Ross Colton leads the way as Lightning even up series with Leafs

1 day ago

Duration 1:31

A pair of goals by Ross Colton lifts Tampa Bay to a 7-3 win over Toronto, evening the series at 2-2. 1:31

Andrei Vasilevskiy stopped 22 shots, improving to an eye-popping 16-0 in the last three post-seasons following a loss.

Tampa carried its dominant performance to close out Friday’s 5-2 defeat — Toronto scored two late empty-netters — into Game 4.

“We talked about finding some success there in the third period and wanting to replicate that,” Stamkos added. “Guys took it to heart.”

William Nylander scored twice for Toronto, while Jake Muzzin also beat Vasilevskiy with the game out of reach.

Jack Campbell allowed five goals on 16 shots before being pulled in favour of Erik Kallgren for the Leafs, who came out flat on a night they could have grabbed a 3-1 stranglehold in the best-of-seven matchup. Kallgren finished with 10 saves.

“It’s disappointing,” Muzzin said. “We battled hard the other night to be in the position we were in. We knew they were gonna come hard.

“Just weren’t ready for it.”

Leafs goalie Jack Campbell reacts after giving up a goal to Corey Perry during the second period on Sunday night. (Chris O’Meara/The Associated Press)

Toronto has taken an NHL-high 32 penalties through four contests, with the Lightning having connected on the power play five times, including once on Sunday.

“We’ve done a pretty good job of, for the most part, not getting involved in the stuff not in between the whistles,” Leafs captain John Tavares said. “But some of the obstruction is getting called tighter than probably we’ve been used to in the past.

“Something we have to adapt to.”

‘It’s one game’

The series now shifts to Scotiabank Arena for Tuesday’s Game 5, while Game 6 goes Thursday back at Amalie Arena. Game 7, if necessary, is scheduled for Saturday in Toronto.

“Scored on their first shot and took it to us, but it’s one game,” said Campbell, who’s allowed 12 goals in his last 145 minutes 25 seconds of action against the Lightning.

“Learn from it, be ready for the next one.”

Looking to get more out of a top line that was largely neutralized in Game 3 by Anthony Cirelli, Brayden Point and Alex Killorn with Tampa getting the last change, Keefe moved Alexander Kerfoot into Michael Bunting’s spot on the wing alongside Auston Matthews and Mitch Marner to begin the game.

But Toronto, which finished the regular season with 115 points, five clear of the Lightning for second in the Atlantic Division, started its third line and third defence pair, and was on the back foot from the drop of the puck as Tampa’s top units came in waves against a skittish opponent.

The Leafs hadn’t even crossed centre when Stamkos — robbed by Campbell on a late one-timer in Game 3 — blasted another of his patented bullets a minute into the first to blow the roof off the sold-out rink after Toronto defenceman Justin Holl couldn’t clear the zone.

“They came out hard and we didn’t execute,” Tavares said. “We have to do a better job of being on our toes and being ready for that.

“We knew it was coming.”

NHL linesman Mark Shewchyk gets in between Maple Leafs forward William Nylander, right, and Lightning defenceman Cal Foote during the third period. (Chris O’Meara/The Associated Press)

The listless visitors went down 2-0 at 5:20 when Muzzin and Campbell couldn’t control a puck down low that popped out to Bellemare in the slot.

Tampa made it 3-0 as the onslaught continued with a second fourth-line goal when Maroon jumped on another miscue by a Toronto defender — Morgan Rielly was the culprit this time — and poked home his own rebound at 7:58 after Campbell made a terrific pad stop.

Vasilevskiy didn’t have much to do at the other end with the shots sitting at 8-1, but was put to work late in the period as Toronto started to finally show a little life.

Matthews fired a wicked backhand off the crossbar before last season’s Conn Smythe Trophy winner as playoff MVP had to be sharp on a deflection down low.

But the Lightning put any thought of a comeback to bed at 3:17 of the middle period when Colton’s snapshot went off Campbell’s glove for the centre’s second goal in as many games.

Tampa followed that up with a Perry goal that made it 5-0 — the third from a Lightning fourth-liner — on a long 5-on-3 man advantage at 5:25 after Tavares was whistled for hooking and David Kampf fired the puck out of play nine seconds later for a delay-of-game call.

Campbell stayed in the game for a couple more minutes only to be pulled in favour of Kallgren following a TV timeout after a long chat with Keefe at the bench.

“I always want to battle,” said the goaltender. “But I always respect the coach’s decision.”

“I know he’s going to continue to battle,” Keefe added. “I just made it clear to him it’s obviously a long way to come back and we need him to be good to go for the next game.”

Leafs’ Jack Campbell stops a shot from Brayden Point during the second period. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)

Nylander got Toronto on the board with a goal on the man advantage at 2:27 of the third to spoil Vasilevskiy’s bid for the seventh playoff shutout of his career before adding his second of the playoffs with the teams skating 4 on 4 at 12:05.

The Leafs pulled Kallgren with under six minutes left in regulation, but Palat scored in into an empty net before Muzzin found the back of the net at 15:41 to make it 6-3.

But Colton added his second into another empty net to seal it.

Toronto hasn’t won a playoff round since 2004 — before the NHL instituted a salary cap and two lockouts ago — and is looking to take a step towards ending a Cup drought dating back 54 years following a string of post-season failures.

Toronto fans gathered around the team’s tunnel leading to the ice surface and started “Go Leafs Go” chants half an hour before warmups.

Tampa’s game operations crew, meanwhile, trolled the visitors by showing a “1967” sign on the rink’s massive scoreboard ahead of the opening faceoff before the Lightning imposed their will early and often.

‘We’ll be better next time’

“We got the split,” Keefe said in trying to take a positive out of Sunday’s disaster. “It was a best-of-five with three games in this building and two at home. Now it’s best-of-three with two in our building. It’s a successful road trip in that sense. Whether you lose the game 2-1 or in the manner that we did tonight, it doesn’t matter.

“You wash it, you move on. We’ll be better next time.”

If not, the Leafs will face another hostile environment Thursday

Lightning bury Maple Leafs early in Game 4 to even series

Sheldon Keefe said Sunday morning his team had yet to produce its best hockey this spring.

Toronto’s head coach is still waiting.

Steven Stamkos scored one minute into the first period to spark an early barrage as the Tampa Bay Lightning steamrolled the Maple Leafs 7-3 to knot their first-round playoff series 2-2.

“We weren’t at the required level,” Keefe said following an embarrassing no-show. “Tampa played at a higher level than us and got rewarded for it.”

Ross Colton, with a pair, Pierre-Edouard Bellemare, Pat Maroon, Corey Perry and Ondrej Palat had the other goals for the two-time defending Stanley Cup champions. Nikita Kucherov and Brandon Hagel added two assists each for the Lightning, who led 3-0 inside the first eight minutes inside a raucous Amalie Arena.

“We had a great start,” Stamkos said. “That was one of our keys, to come out and play the right way.”

WATCH l Leafs fall to Lightning in Game 4:

Ross Colton leads the way as Lightning even up series with Leafs

10 hours ago

Duration 1:31

A pair of goals by Ross Colton lifts Tampa Bay to a 7-3 win over Toronto, evening the series at 2-2. 1:31

Andrei Vasilevskiy stopped 22 shots, improving to an eye-popping 16-0 in the last three post-seasons following a loss.

Tampa carried its dominant performance to close out Friday’s 5-2 defeat — Toronto scored two late empty-netters — into Game 4.

“We talked about finding some success there in the third period and wanting to replicate that,” Stamkos added. “Guys took it to heart.”

William Nylander scored twice for Toronto, while Jake Muzzin also beat Vasilevskiy with the game out of reach.

Jack Campbell allowed five goals on 16 shots before being pulled in favour of Erik Kallgren for the Leafs, who came out flat on a night they could have grabbed a 3-1 stranglehold in the best-of-seven matchup. Kallgren finished with 10 saves.

“It’s disappointing,” Muzzin said. “We battled hard the other night to be in the position we were in. We knew they were gonna come hard.

“Just weren’t ready for it.”

Leafs goalie Jack Campbell reacts after giving up a goal to Corey Perry during the second period on Sunday night. (Chris O’Meara/The Associated Press)

Toronto has taken an NHL-high 32 penalties through four contests, with the Lightning having connected on the power play five times, including once on Sunday.

“We’ve done a pretty good job of, for the most part, not getting involved in the stuff not in between the whistles,” Leafs captain John Tavares said. “But some of the obstruction is getting called tighter than probably we’ve been used to in the past.

“Something we have to adapt to.”

‘It’s one game’

The series now shifts to Scotiabank Arena for Tuesday’s Game 5, while Game 6 goes Thursday back at Amalie Arena. Game 7, if necessary, is scheduled for Saturday in Toronto.

“Scored on their first shot and took it to us, but it’s one game,” said Campbell, who’s allowed 12 goals in his last 145 minutes 25 seconds of action against the Lightning.

“Learn from it, be ready for the next one.”

Looking to get more out of a top line that was largely neutralized in Game 3 by Anthony Cirelli, Brayden Point and Alex Killorn with Tampa getting the last change, Keefe moved Alexander Kerfoot into Michael Bunting’s spot on the wing alongside Auston Matthews and Mitch Marner to begin the game.

But Toronto, which finished the regular season with 115 points, five clear of the Lightning for second in the Atlantic Division, started its third line and third defence pair, and was on the back foot from the drop of the puck as Tampa’s top units came in waves against a skittish opponent.

The Leafs hadn’t even crossed centre when Stamkos — robbed by Campbell on a late one-timer in Game 3 — blasted another of his patented bullets a minute into the first to blow the roof off the sold-out rink after Toronto defenceman Justin Holl couldn’t clear the zone.

“They came out hard and we didn’t execute,” Tavares said. “We have to do a better job of being on our toes and being ready for that.

“We knew it was coming.”

NHL linesman Mark Shewchyk gets in between Maple Leafs forward William Nylander, right, and Lightning defenceman Cal Foote during the third period. (Chris O’Meara/The Associated Press)

The listless visitors went down 2-0 at 5:20 when Muzzin and Campbell couldn’t control a puck down low that popped out to Bellemare in the slot.

Tampa made it 3-0 as the onslaught continued with a second fourth-line goal when Maroon jumped on another miscue by a Toronto defender — Morgan Rielly was the culprit this time — and poked home his own rebound at 7:58 after Campbell made a terrific pad stop.

Vasilevskiy didn’t have much to do at the other end with the shots sitting at 8-1, but was put to work late in the period as Toronto started to finally show a little life.

Matthews fired a wicked backhand off the crossbar before last season’s Conn Smythe Trophy winner as playoff MVP had to be sharp on a deflection down low.

But the Lightning put any thought of a comeback to bed at 3:17 of the middle period when Colton’s snapshot went off Campbell’s glove for the centre’s second goal in as many games.

Tampa followed that up with a Perry goal that made it 5-0 — the third from a Lightning fourth-liner — on a long 5-on-3 man advantage at 5:25 after Tavares was whistled for hooking and David Kampf fired the puck out of play nine seconds later for a delay-of-game call.

Campbell stayed in the game for a couple more minutes only to be pulled in favour of Kallgren following a TV timeout after a long chat with Keefe at the bench.

“I always want to battle,” said the goaltender. “But I always respect the coach’s decision.”

“I know he’s going to continue to battle,” Keefe added. “I just made it clear to him it’s obviously a long way to come back and we need him to be good to go for the next game.”

Leafs’ Jack Campbell stops a shot from Brayden Point during the second period. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)

Nylander got Toronto on the board with a goal on the man advantage at 2:27 of the third to spoil Vasilevskiy’s bid for the seventh playoff shutout of his career before adding his second of the playoffs with the teams skating 4 on 4 at 12:05.

The Leafs pulled Kallgren with under six minutes left in regulation, but Palat scored in into an empty net before Muzzin found the back of the net at 15:41 to make it 6-3.

But Colton added his second into another empty net to seal it.

Toronto hasn’t won a playoff round since 2004 — before the NHL instituted a salary cap and two lockouts ago — and is looking to take a step towards ending a Cup drought dating back 54 years following a string of post-season failures.

Toronto fans gathered around the team’s tunnel leading to the ice surface and started “Go Leafs Go” chants half an hour before warmups.

Tampa’s game operations crew, meanwhile, trolled the visitors by showing a “1967” sign on the rink’s massive scoreboard ahead of the opening faceoff before the Lightning imposed their will early and often.

‘We’ll be better next time’

“We got the split,” Keefe said in trying to take a positive out of Sunday’s disaster. “It was a best-of-five with three games in this building and two at home. Now it’s best-of-three with two in our building. It’s a successful road trip in that sense. Whether you lose the game 2-1 or in the manner that we did tonight, it doesn’t matter.

“You wash it, you move on. We’ll be better next time.”

If not, the Leafs will face another hostile environment Thursday

Lightning bury Maple Leafs early in Game 4 to even series

Sheldon Keefe said Sunday morning his team had yet to produce its best hockey this spring.

Toronto’s head coach is still waiting.

Steven Stamkos scored one minute into the first period to spark an early barrage as the Tampa Bay Lightning steamrolled the Maple Leafs 7-3 to knot their first-round playoff series 2-2.

“We weren’t at the required level,” Keefe said following an embarrassing no-show. “Tampa played at a higher level than us and got rewarded for it.”

Ross Colton, with a pair, Pierre-Edouard Bellemare, Pat Maroon, Corey Perry and Ondrej Palat had the other goals for the two-time defending Stanley Cup champions. Nikita Kucherov and Brandon Hagel added two assists each for the Lightning, who led 3-0 inside the first eight minutes inside a raucous Amalie Arena.

“We had a great start,” Stamkos said. “That was one of our keys, to come out and play the right way.”

WATCH l Leafs fall to Lightning in Game 4:

Ross Colton leads the way as Lightning even up series with Leafs

17 hours ago

Duration 1:31

A pair of goals by Ross Colton lifts Tampa Bay to a 7-3 win over Toronto, evening the series at 2-2. 1:31

Andrei Vasilevskiy stopped 22 shots, improving to an eye-popping 16-0 in the last three post-seasons following a loss.

Tampa carried its dominant performance to close out Friday’s 5-2 defeat — Toronto scored two late empty-netters — into Game 4.

“We talked about finding some success there in the third period and wanting to replicate that,” Stamkos added. “Guys took it to heart.”

William Nylander scored twice for Toronto, while Jake Muzzin also beat Vasilevskiy with the game out of reach.

Jack Campbell allowed five goals on 16 shots before being pulled in favour of Erik Kallgren for the Leafs, who came out flat on a night they could have grabbed a 3-1 stranglehold in the best-of-seven matchup. Kallgren finished with 10 saves.

“It’s disappointing,” Muzzin said. “We battled hard the other night to be in the position we were in. We knew they were gonna come hard.

“Just weren’t ready for it.”

Leafs goalie Jack Campbell reacts after giving up a goal to Corey Perry during the second period on Sunday night. (Chris O’Meara/The Associated Press)

Toronto has taken an NHL-high 32 penalties through four contests, with the Lightning having connected on the power play five times, including once on Sunday.

“We’ve done a pretty good job of, for the most part, not getting involved in the stuff not in between the whistles,” Leafs captain John Tavares said. “But some of the obstruction is getting called tighter than probably we’ve been used to in the past.

“Something we have to adapt to.”

‘It’s one game’

The series now shifts to Scotiabank Arena for Tuesday’s Game 5, while Game 6 goes Thursday back at Amalie Arena. Game 7, if necessary, is scheduled for Saturday in Toronto.

“Scored on their first shot and took it to us, but it’s one game,” said Campbell, who’s allowed 12 goals in his last 145 minutes 25 seconds of action against the Lightning.

“Learn from it, be ready for the next one.”

Looking to get more out of a top line that was largely neutralized in Game 3 by Anthony Cirelli, Brayden Point and Alex Killorn with Tampa getting the last change, Keefe moved Alexander Kerfoot into Michael Bunting’s spot on the wing alongside Auston Matthews and Mitch Marner to begin the game.

But Toronto, which finished the regular season with 115 points, five clear of the Lightning for second in the Atlantic Division, started its third line and third defence pair, and was on the back foot from the drop of the puck as Tampa’s top units came in waves against a skittish opponent.

The Leafs hadn’t even crossed centre when Stamkos — robbed by Campbell on a late one-timer in Game 3 — blasted another of his patented bullets a minute into the first to blow the roof off the sold-out rink after Toronto defenceman Justin Holl couldn’t clear the zone.

“They came out hard and we didn’t execute,” Tavares said. “We have to do a better job of being on our toes and being ready for that.

“We knew it was coming.”

NHL linesman Mark Shewchyk gets in between Maple Leafs forward William Nylander, right, and Lightning defenceman Cal Foote during the third period. (Chris O’Meara/The Associated Press)

The listless visitors went down 2-0 at 5:20 when Muzzin and Campbell couldn’t control a puck down low that popped out to Bellemare in the slot.

Tampa made it 3-0 as the onslaught continued with a second fourth-line goal when Maroon jumped on another miscue by a Toronto defender — Morgan Rielly was the culprit this time — and poked home his own rebound at 7:58 after Campbell made a terrific pad stop.

Vasilevskiy didn’t have much to do at the other end with the shots sitting at 8-1, but was put to work late in the period as Toronto started to finally show a little life.

Matthews fired a wicked backhand off the crossbar before last season’s Conn Smythe Trophy winner as playoff MVP had to be sharp on a deflection down low.

But the Lightning put any thought of a comeback to bed at 3:17 of the middle period when Colton’s snapshot went off Campbell’s glove for the centre’s second goal in as many games.

Tampa followed that up with a Perry goal that made it 5-0 — the third from a Lightning fourth-liner — on a long 5-on-3 man advantage at 5:25 after Tavares was whistled for hooking and David Kampf fired the puck out of play nine seconds later for a delay-of-game call.

Campbell stayed in the game for a couple more minutes only to be pulled in favour of Kallgren following a TV timeout after a long chat with Keefe at the bench.

“I always want to battle,” said the goaltender. “But I always respect the coach’s decision.”

“I know he’s going to continue to battle,” Keefe added. “I just made it clear to him it’s obviously a long way to come back and we need him to be good to go for the next game.”

Leafs’ Jack Campbell stops a shot from Brayden Point during the second period. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)

Nylander got Toronto on the board with a goal on the man advantage at 2:27 of the third to spoil Vasilevskiy’s bid for the seventh playoff shutout of his career before adding his second of the playoffs with the teams skating 4 on 4 at 12:05.

The Leafs pulled Kallgren with under six minutes left in regulation, but Palat scored in into an empty net before Muzzin found the back of the net at 15:41 to make it 6-3.

But Colton added his second into another empty net to seal it.

Toronto hasn’t won a playoff round since 2004 — before the NHL instituted a salary cap and two lockouts ago — and is looking to take a step towards ending a Cup drought dating back 54 years following a string of post-season failures.

Toronto fans gathered around the team’s tunnel leading to the ice surface and started “Go Leafs Go” chants half an hour before warmups.

Tampa’s game operations crew, meanwhile, trolled the visitors by showing a “1967” sign on the rink’s massive scoreboard ahead of the opening faceoff before the Lightning imposed their will early and often.

‘We’ll be better next time’

“We got the split,” Keefe said in trying to take a positive out of Sunday’s disaster. “It was a best-of-five with three games in this building and two at home. Now it’s best-of-three with two in our building. It’s a successful road trip in that sense. Whether you lose the game 2-1 or in the manner that we did tonight, it doesn’t matter.

“You wash it, you move on. We’ll be better next time.”

If not, the Leafs will face another hostile environment Thursday

Kyrou, Perron combine for 4 goals as Blues cruise past Wild to even series

St. Louis goalie Jordan Binnington didn’t lose any sleep when he was informed by coach Craig Berube that he would be starting for the first time this post-season on Sunday.

“He’s always the same, he doesn’t give me much of a reaction,” Berube said.

Instead, Binnington let his play do the talking.

Binnington made 28 saves and the Blues beat the Minnesota Wild 5-2 on Sunday to even the best-of-seven Western Conference series at two games apiece.

Jordan Kyrou and David Perron each scored twice and Ryan O’Reilly added a goal and two assists. Perron also had an assist for St. Louis.

Kirill Kaprizov and Matt Boldy scored for Minnesota. Marc-Andre Fleury made 29 saves.

Game 5 is Tuesday night at St. Paul, Minnesota, before returning to St. Louis for Game 6 on Thursday.

Binnington, who had lost his previous nine post-season starts, picked up his first playoff win since beating Boston in Game 7 of the 2019 Stanley Cup Final. He denied Kaprizov from point-blank range late in the second period. Binnington also stopped Mats Zuccarello on a 2-on-1 breakout midway through the final period.

“I felt prepared,” Binnington said. “I felt pretty good.”

Binnington had been supplanted by Ville Husso, who have up nine goals on 59 shots combined in Games 2 and 3 after shutting out the Wild with 37 saves in the opener.

“You have to be ready for whatever comes up,” Binnington said. “We just have to focus on our job, whatever it is that night.”

Coach Craig Berube said he went with Binnington as a hunch.

“We wanted to make a switch and just change the momentum and luck a little bit,” Berube said.

Kyrou and Perron scored 54 seconds apart in the second period to break a 1-1 tie.,

Perron converted the go-ahead score on a shot that squeezed past Fleury towards the net. Minnesota forward Marcus Foligno tried to keep the puck from rolling across the line, but he flipped it off the back of Fleury and into the net.

Kyrou got his second of the game to push the lead to 3-1 with a shot off a pass from Ryan O’Reilly, who assisted on both second-period goals.

“Obviously, we wanted to come out hot, and come out strong,” Kyrou said. “We did that today and we should continue to do it all series long.”

Boldy cut the deficit to 3-2 by scoring off a scramble in from of the net 2:39 into the final period.

Perron added an empty net goal with 1:58 remaining, and O’Reilly had a power-play goal with 1 minute left to cap the scoring.

St. Louis struck first when Kyrou pounced on his own rebound just 4:19 into the game.

Kaprizov tied it 1-1 with his fifth goal of the series off a pass from Jared Spurgeon with 5:54 left in the opening period.

Kaprivoz, who recorded the first hat trick in post-season franchise history in Game 2, was wide open in the slot.

His five goals ties him with Wes Walz and Marian Gaborik for most goals in a series. Walz and Gaborik each scored five times in the 2003 Western Conference semifinals against Vancouver.

“It’s not one guy, it’s the Minnesota Wild that didn’t get to our game quick enough,” Minnesota coach Dean Evason said.. “In the third period we did. But it was a little too late.”

Marchand, Bergeron lead Bruins to series-tying victory

Brad Marchand raced toward the empty net, and there was nothing Carolina defenceman Tony DeAngelo could do except throw his stick at the puck. Forward Jesperi Kotkaniemi shattered his across the goal in frustration.

It’s the playoffs, and Marchand is at his best — scoring, passing and getting under his opponent’s skin.

“It’s a time he loves to play, and he shows it,” Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy said after Marchand’s two-goal, three-assist game in Boston’s 5-2 Game 4 victory over the Hurricanes on Sunday tied the first-round playoff series at 2.

“There’s some chirping going on now, too,” Cassidy said. “And I think that can elevate his game, as well.”

Patrice Bergeron had a goal and two assists and drew a high-sticking double minor from Sebastian Aho at the end of the second period that gave the Bruins a 5-on-3 and left their captain with a black eye and several stitches.

Sixty-eight seconds after the penalty, and 44 seconds into the third period, Marchand scored to break a 2-2 tie.

Rookie Jeremy Swayman made 23 saves for his second straight win, and David Pastrnak had a goal and an assist.

The series returns to Carolina for Game 5 on Tuesday night.

“It starts over now. We just regroup,” Hurricanes coach Rod Brind’Amour said. “You should have a little emotion right now. It should hurt, and it should bother you and then tomorrow you start fresh.”

And now, the Bruins are assured a Game 6 in Boston on Thursday.

“This is what every kid’s kind of hoping — to get that opportunity playing for that Cup,” Marchand said. “These are the most fun games to play in, when there’s high emotion, high intensity and the most is on the line. If you can’t play in these games, I don’t know what you’re playing for.”

Jake DeBrusk also scored for the Bruins, who scratched top defenceman Charlie McAvoy after he went into the NHL’s COVID-19 protocol about an hour before the opening faceoff. No. 2 defenceman Hampus Lindholm has been out since a hit to the head in Game 2.

“We’re playing for our season,” Marchand said. “It’s really tough when you lose guys like that, but here’s a lot of pride in the room, a lot of character We’ve always shown that.”

Brett Pesce and Jordan Staal scored for Carolina, and Antti Raanta returned to stop 23 shots for the Metropolitan Division champions.

Pesce gave Carolina the lead six minutes into the game, the fourth straight time the Hurricanes have scored first — the seventh time, if you count their three regular-season wins over Boston.

But Bergeron tied it with four minutes to play in the first period when he slid a loose puck through Raanta’s legs. Just 33 seconds into the second period, Nino Niederreiter backhanded it out to Staal for the one-timer that gave Carolina a 2-1 lead.

In the last 90 seconds of the second period, Marchand backhanded the puck into Raanta and it wound up in the crease just sitting there for DeBrusk to clean up.

Brind’Amour challenged for goalie interference, but the call stood. That gave Boston a power play, and it became a 5-on-3 when Aho cut Bergeron’s eye.

Boston still had 44 seconds on the 5-on-3 and 2:58 after that on the double-minor when the third period started. With one second left in the two-man advantage, Marchand wristed one into the net to give Boston its first lead of the day.

Pastrnak added an insurance goal five minutes later, and Marchand put in an empty-netter.

Kyrou, Perron combine for 4 goals as Blues cruise past Wild to even series

St. Louis goalie Jordan Binnington didn’t lose any sleep when he was informed by coach Craig Berube that he would be starting for the first time this post-season on Sunday.

“He’s always the same, he doesn’t give me much of a reaction,” Berube said.

Instead, Binnington let his play do the talking.

Binnington made 28 saves and the Blues beat the Minnesota Wild 5-2 on Sunday to even the best-of-seven Western Conference series at two games apiece.

Jordan Kyrou and David Perron each scored twice and Ryan O’Reilly added a goal and two assists. Perron also had an assist for St. Louis.

Kirill Kaprizov and Matt Boldy scored for Minnesota. Marc-Andre Fleury made 29 saves.

Game 5 is Tuesday night at St. Paul, Minnesota, before returning to St. Louis for Game 6 on Thursday.

Binnington, who had lost his previous nine post-season starts, picked up his first playoff win since beating Boston in Game 7 of the 2019 Stanley Cup Final. He denied Kaprizov from point-blank range late in the second period. Binnington also stopped Mats Zuccarello on a 2-on-1 breakout midway through the final period.

“I felt prepared,” Binnington said. “I felt pretty good.”

Binnington had been supplanted by Ville Husso, who have up nine goals on 59 shots combined in Games 2 and 3 after shutting out the Wild with 37 saves in the opener.

“You have to be ready for whatever comes up,” Binnington said. “We just have to focus on our job, whatever it is that night.”

Coach Craig Berube said he went with Binnington as a hunch.

“We wanted to make a switch and just change the momentum and luck a little bit,” Berube said.

Kyrou and Perron scored 54 seconds apart in the second period to break a 1-1 tie.,

Perron converted the go-ahead score on a shot that squeezed past Fleury towards the net. Minnesota forward Marcus Foligno tried to keep the puck from rolling across the line, but he flipped it off the back of Fleury and into the net.

Kyrou got his second of the game to push the lead to 3-1 with a shot off a pass from Ryan O’Reilly, who assisted on both second-period goals.

“Obviously, we wanted to come out hot, and come out strong,” Kyrou said. “We did that today and we should continue to do it all series long.”

Boldy cut the deficit to 3-2 by scoring off a scramble in from of the net 2:39 into the final period.

Perron added an empty net goal with 1:58 remaining, and O’Reilly had a power-play goal with 1 minute left to cap the scoring.

St. Louis struck first when Kyrou pounced on his own rebound just 4:19 into the game.

Kaprizov tied it 1-1 with his fifth goal of the series off a pass from Jared Spurgeon with 5:54 left in the opening period.

Kaprivoz, who recorded the first hat trick in post-season franchise history in Game 2, was wide open in the slot.

His five goals ties him with Wes Walz and Marian Gaborik for most goals in a series. Walz and Gaborik each scored five times in the 2003 Western Conference semifinals against Vancouver.

“It’s not one guy, it’s the Minnesota Wild that didn’t get to our game quick enough,” Minnesota coach Dean Evason said.. “In the third period we did. But it was a little too late.”

Marchand, Bergeron lead Bruins to series-tying victory

Brad Marchand raced toward the empty net, and there was nothing Carolina defenceman Tony DeAngelo could do except throw his stick at the puck. Forward Jesperi Kotkaniemi shattered his across the goal in frustration.

It’s the playoffs, and Marchand is at his best — scoring, passing and getting under his opponent’s skin.

“It’s a time he loves to play, and he shows it,” Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy said after Marchand’s two-goal, three-assist game in Boston’s 5-2 Game 4 victory over the Hurricanes on Sunday tied the first-round playoff series at 2.

“There’s some chirping going on now, too,” Cassidy said. “And I think that can elevate his game, as well.”

Patrice Bergeron had a goal and two assists and drew a high-sticking double minor from Sebastian Aho at the end of the second period that gave the Bruins a 5-on-3 and left their captain with a black eye and several stitches.

Sixty-eight seconds after the penalty, and 44 seconds into the third period, Marchand scored to break a 2-2 tie.

Rookie Jeremy Swayman made 23 saves for his second straight win, and David Pastrnak had a goal and an assist.

The series returns to Carolina for Game 5 on Tuesday night.

“It starts over now. We just regroup,” Hurricanes coach Rod Brind’Amour said. “You should have a little emotion right now. It should hurt, and it should bother you and then tomorrow you start fresh.”

And now, the Bruins are assured a Game 6 in Boston on Thursday.

“This is what every kid’s kind of hoping — to get that opportunity playing for that Cup,” Marchand said. “These are the most fun games to play in, when there’s high emotion, high intensity and the most is on the line. If you can’t play in these games, I don’t know what you’re playing for.”

Jake DeBrusk also scored for the Bruins, who scratched top defenceman Charlie McAvoy after he went into the NHL’s COVID-19 protocol about an hour before the opening faceoff. No. 2 defenceman Hampus Lindholm has been out since a hit to the head in Game 2.

“We’re playing for our season,” Marchand said. “It’s really tough when you lose guys like that, but here’s a lot of pride in the room, a lot of character We’ve always shown that.”

Brett Pesce and Jordan Staal scored for Carolina, and Antti Raanta returned to stop 23 shots for the Metropolitan Division champions.

Pesce gave Carolina the lead six minutes into the game, the fourth straight time the Hurricanes have scored first — the seventh time, if you count their three regular-season wins over Boston.

But Bergeron tied it with four minutes to play in the first period when he slid a loose puck through Raanta’s legs. Just 33 seconds into the second period, Nino Niederreiter backhanded it out to Staal for the one-timer that gave Carolina a 2-1 lead.

In the last 90 seconds of the second period, Marchand backhanded the puck into Raanta and it wound up in the crease just sitting there for DeBrusk to clean up.

Brind’Amour challenged for goalie interference, but the call stood. That gave Boston a power play, and it became a 5-on-3 when Aho cut Bergeron’s eye.

Boston still had 44 seconds on the 5-on-3 and 2:58 after that on the double-minor when the third period started. With one second left in the two-man advantage, Marchand wristed one into the net to give Boston its first lead of the day.

Pastrnak added an insurance goal five minutes later, and Marchand put in an empty-netter.

Kyrou, Perron combine for 4 goals as Blues cruise past Wild to even series

St. Louis goalie Jordan Binnington didn’t lose any sleep when he was informed by coach Craig Berube that he would be starting for the first time this post-season on Sunday.

“He’s always the same, he doesn’t give me much of a reaction,” Berube said.

Instead, Binnington let his play do the talking.

Binnington made 28 saves and the Blues beat the Minnesota Wild 5-2 on Sunday to even the best-of-seven Western Conference series at two games apiece.

Jordan Kyrou and David Perron each scored twice and Ryan O’Reilly added a goal and two assists. Perron also had an assist for St. Louis.

Kirill Kaprizov and Matt Boldy scored for Minnesota. Marc-Andre Fleury made 29 saves.

Game 5 is Tuesday night at St. Paul, Minnesota, before returning to St. Louis for Game 6 on Thursday.

Binnington, who had lost his previous nine post-season starts, picked up his first playoff win since beating Boston in Game 7 of the 2019 Stanley Cup Final. He denied Kaprizov from point-blank range late in the second period. Binnington also stopped Mats Zuccarello on a 2-on-1 breakout midway through the final period.

“I felt prepared,” Binnington said. “I felt pretty good.”

Binnington had been supplanted by Ville Husso, who have up nine goals on 59 shots combined in Games 2 and 3 after shutting out the Wild with 37 saves in the opener.

“You have to be ready for whatever comes up,” Binnington said. “We just have to focus on our job, whatever it is that night.”

Coach Craig Berube said he went with Binnington as a hunch.

“We wanted to make a switch and just change the momentum and luck a little bit,” Berube said.

Kyrou and Perron scored 54 seconds apart in the second period to break a 1-1 tie.,

Perron converted the go-ahead score on a shot that squeezed past Fleury towards the net. Minnesota forward Marcus Foligno tried to keep the puck from rolling across the line, but he flipped it off the back of Fleury and into the net.

Kyrou got his second of the game to push the lead to 3-1 with a shot off a pass from Ryan O’Reilly, who assisted on both second-period goals.

“Obviously, we wanted to come out hot, and come out strong,” Kyrou said. “We did that today and we should continue to do it all series long.”

Boldy cut the deficit to 3-2 by scoring off a scramble in from of the net 2:39 into the final period.

Perron added an empty net goal with 1:58 remaining, and O’Reilly had a power-play goal with 1 minute left to cap the scoring.

St. Louis struck first when Kyrou pounced on his own rebound just 4:19 into the game.

Kaprizov tied it 1-1 with his fifth goal of the series off a pass from Jared Spurgeon with 5:54 left in the opening period.

Kaprivoz, who recorded the first hat trick in post-season franchise history in Game 2, was wide open in the slot.

His five goals ties him with Wes Walz and Marian Gaborik for most goals in a series. Walz and Gaborik each scored five times in the 2003 Western Conference semifinals against Vancouver.

“It’s not one guy, it’s the Minnesota Wild that didn’t get to our game quick enough,” Minnesota coach Dean Evason said.. “In the third period we did. But it was a little too late.”

Marchand, Bergeron lead Bruins to series-tying victory

Brad Marchand raced toward the empty net, and there was nothing Carolina defenceman Tony DeAngelo could do except throw his stick at the puck. Forward Jesperi Kotkaniemi shattered his across the goal in frustration.

It’s the playoffs, and Marchand is at his best — scoring, passing and getting under his opponent’s skin.

“It’s a time he loves to play, and he shows it,” Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy said after Marchand’s two-goal, three-assist game in Boston’s 5-2 Game 4 victory over the Hurricanes on Sunday tied the first-round playoff series at 2.

“There’s some chirping going on now, too,” Cassidy said. “And I think that can elevate his game, as well.”

Patrice Bergeron had a goal and two assists and drew a high-sticking double minor from Sebastian Aho at the end of the second period that gave the Bruins a 5-on-3 and left their captain with a black eye and several stitches.

Sixty-eight seconds after the penalty, and 44 seconds into the third period, Marchand scored to break a 2-2 tie.

Rookie Jeremy Swayman made 23 saves for his second straight win, and David Pastrnak had a goal and an assist.

The series returns to Carolina for Game 5 on Tuesday night.

“It starts over now. We just regroup,” Hurricanes coach Rod Brind’Amour said. “You should have a little emotion right now. It should hurt, and it should bother you and then tomorrow you start fresh.”

And now, the Bruins are assured a Game 6 in Boston on Thursday.

“This is what every kid’s kind of hoping — to get that opportunity playing for that Cup,” Marchand said. “These are the most fun games to play in, when there’s high emotion, high intensity and the most is on the line. If you can’t play in these games, I don’t know what you’re playing for.”

Jake DeBrusk also scored for the Bruins, who scratched top defenceman Charlie McAvoy after he went into the NHL’s COVID-19 protocol about an hour before the opening faceoff. No. 2 defenceman Hampus Lindholm has been out since a hit to the head in Game 2.

“We’re playing for our season,” Marchand said. “It’s really tough when you lose guys like that, but here’s a lot of pride in the room, a lot of character We’ve always shown that.”

Brett Pesce and Jordan Staal scored for Carolina, and Antti Raanta returned to stop 23 shots for the Metropolitan Division champions.

Pesce gave Carolina the lead six minutes into the game, the fourth straight time the Hurricanes have scored first — the seventh time, if you count their three regular-season wins over Boston.

But Bergeron tied it with four minutes to play in the first period when he slid a loose puck through Raanta’s legs. Just 33 seconds into the second period, Nino Niederreiter backhanded it out to Staal for the one-timer that gave Carolina a 2-1 lead.

In the last 90 seconds of the second period, Marchand backhanded the puck into Raanta and it wound up in the crease just sitting there for DeBrusk to clean up.

Brind’Amour challenged for goalie interference, but the call stood. That gave Boston a power play, and it became a 5-on-3 when Aho cut Bergeron’s eye.

Boston still had 44 seconds on the 5-on-3 and 2:58 after that on the double-minor when the third period started. With one second left in the two-man advantage, Marchand wristed one into the net to give Boston its first lead of the day.

Pastrnak added an insurance goal five minutes later, and Marchand put in an empty-netter.

Kyrou, Perron combine for 4 goals as Blues cruise past Wild to even series

St. Louis goalie Jordan Binnington didn’t lose any sleep when he was informed by coach Craig Berube that he would be starting for the first time this post-season on Sunday.

“He’s always the same, he doesn’t give me much of a reaction,” Berube said.

Instead, Binnington let his play do the talking.

Binnington made 28 saves and the Blues beat the Minnesota Wild 5-2 on Sunday to even the best-of-seven Western Conference series at two games apiece.

Jordan Kyrou and David Perron each scored twice and Ryan O’Reilly added a goal and two assists. Perron also had an assist for St. Louis.

Kirill Kaprizov and Matt Boldy scored for Minnesota. Marc-Andre Fleury made 29 saves.

Game 5 is Tuesday night at St. Paul, Minnesota, before returning to St. Louis for Game 6 on Thursday.

Binnington, who had lost his previous nine post-season starts, picked up his first playoff win since beating Boston in Game 7 of the 2019 Stanley Cup Final. He denied Kaprizov from point-blank range late in the second period. Binnington also stopped Mats Zuccarello on a 2-on-1 breakout midway through the final period.

“I felt prepared,” Binnington said. “I felt pretty good.”

Binnington had been supplanted by Ville Husso, who have up nine goals on 59 shots combined in Games 2 and 3 after shutting out the Wild with 37 saves in the opener.

“You have to be ready for whatever comes up,” Binnington said. “We just have to focus on our job, whatever it is that night.”

Coach Craig Berube said he went with Binnington as a hunch.

“We wanted to make a switch and just change the momentum and luck a little bit,” Berube said.

Kyrou and Perron scored 54 seconds apart in the second period to break a 1-1 tie.,

Perron converted the go-ahead score on a shot that squeezed past Fleury towards the net. Minnesota forward Marcus Foligno tried to keep the puck from rolling across the line, but he flipped it off the back of Fleury and into the net.

Kyrou got his second of the game to push the lead to 3-1 with a shot off a pass from Ryan O’Reilly, who assisted on both second-period goals.

“Obviously, we wanted to come out hot, and come out strong,” Kyrou said. “We did that today and we should continue to do it all series long.”

Boldy cut the deficit to 3-2 by scoring off a scramble in from of the net 2:39 into the final period.

Perron added an empty net goal with 1:58 remaining, and O’Reilly had a power-play goal with 1 minute left to cap the scoring.

St. Louis struck first when Kyrou pounced on his own rebound just 4:19 into the game.

Kaprizov tied it 1-1 with his fifth goal of the series off a pass from Jared Spurgeon with 5:54 left in the opening period.

Kaprivoz, who recorded the first hat trick in post-season franchise history in Game 2, was wide open in the slot.

His five goals ties him with Wes Walz and Marian Gaborik for most goals in a series. Walz and Gaborik each scored five times in the 2003 Western Conference semifinals against Vancouver.

“It’s not one guy, it’s the Minnesota Wild that didn’t get to our game quick enough,” Minnesota coach Dean Evason said.. “In the third period we did. But it was a little too late.”

Marchand, Bergeron lead Bruins to series-tying victory

Brad Marchand raced toward the empty net, and there was nothing Carolina defenceman Tony DeAngelo could do except throw his stick at the puck. Forward Jesperi Kotkaniemi shattered his across the goal in frustration.

It’s the playoffs, and Marchand is at his best — scoring, passing and getting under his opponent’s skin.

“It’s a time he loves to play, and he shows it,” Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy said after Marchand’s two-goal, three-assist game in Boston’s 5-2 Game 4 victory over the Hurricanes on Sunday tied the first-round playoff series at 2.

“There’s some chirping going on now, too,” Cassidy said. “And I think that can elevate his game, as well.”

Patrice Bergeron had a goal and two assists and drew a high-sticking double minor from Sebastian Aho at the end of the second period that gave the Bruins a 5-on-3 and left their captain with a black eye and several stitches.

Sixty-eight seconds after the penalty, and 44 seconds into the third period, Marchand scored to break a 2-2 tie.

Rookie Jeremy Swayman made 23 saves for his second straight win, and David Pastrnak had a goal and an assist.

The series returns to Carolina for Game 5 on Tuesday night.

“It starts over now. We just regroup,” Hurricanes coach Rod Brind’Amour said. “You should have a little emotion right now. It should hurt, and it should bother you and then tomorrow you start fresh.”

And now, the Bruins are assured a Game 6 in Boston on Thursday.

“This is what every kid’s kind of hoping — to get that opportunity playing for that Cup,” Marchand said. “These are the most fun games to play in, when there’s high emotion, high intensity and the most is on the line. If you can’t play in these games, I don’t know what you’re playing for.”

Jake DeBrusk also scored for the Bruins, who scratched top defenceman Charlie McAvoy after he went into the NHL’s COVID-19 protocol about an hour before the opening faceoff. No. 2 defenceman Hampus Lindholm has been out since a hit to the head in Game 2.

“We’re playing for our season,” Marchand said. “It’s really tough when you lose guys like that, but here’s a lot of pride in the room, a lot of character We’ve always shown that.”

Brett Pesce and Jordan Staal scored for Carolina, and Antti Raanta returned to stop 23 shots for the Metropolitan Division champions.

Pesce gave Carolina the lead six minutes into the game, the fourth straight time the Hurricanes have scored first — the seventh time, if you count their three regular-season wins over Boston.

But Bergeron tied it with four minutes to play in the first period when he slid a loose puck through Raanta’s legs. Just 33 seconds into the second period, Nino Niederreiter backhanded it out to Staal for the one-timer that gave Carolina a 2-1 lead.

In the last 90 seconds of the second period, Marchand backhanded the puck into Raanta and it wound up in the crease just sitting there for DeBrusk to clean up.

Brind’Amour challenged for goalie interference, but the call stood. That gave Boston a power play, and it became a 5-on-3 when Aho cut Bergeron’s eye.

Boston still had 44 seconds on the 5-on-3 and 2:58 after that on the double-minor when the third period started. With one second left in the two-man advantage, Marchand wristed one into the net to give Boston its first lead of the day.

Pastrnak added an insurance goal five minutes later, and Marchand put in an empty-netter.

Stars' Benn, Capitals' Kuznetsov fined $5,000 US for high-sticking

The NHL on Sunday fined forwards Jamie Benn of the Dallas Stars and Washington’s Evgeny Kuznetsov $5,000 US for high-sticking violations in Saturday’s playoff games.

The fines are the maximum allowable under the collective bargaining agreement. Neither forward was penalized in their respective games.

Benn, the Dallas captain, was fined for high-sticking Calgary Flames forward Andrew Mangiapane during the Stars’ 4-2 home win in Game 3.

The Stars have a 2-1 lead in the first-round series, which resumes Monday with Game 4 in Dallas.

Benn, 32, has not scored in the series. He had 18 goals and 46 points in 82 games in the regular season.

Kuznetsov, 29, was fined for high-sticking Florida Panthers forward Noel Acciari during the Capitals’ 6-1 home win in Game 3.

Washington leads the first-round series 2-1 and hosts Game 4 on Monday night.

Kuznetsov, who has one goal in the series, amassed 24 goals and 78 points in 79 contests during the regular season.

Stars' Benn, Capitals' Kuznetsov fined $5,000 US for high-sticking

The NHL on Sunday fined forwards Jamie Benn of the Dallas Stars and Washington’s Evgeny Kuznetsov $5,000 US for high-sticking violations in Saturday’s playoff games.

The fines are the maximum allowable under the collective bargaining agreement. Neither forward was penalized in their respective games.

Benn, the Dallas captain, was fined for high-sticking Calgary Flames forward Andrew Mangiapane during the Stars’ 4-2 home win in Game 3.

The Stars have a 2-1 lead in the first-round series, which resumes Monday with Game 4 in Dallas.

Benn, 32, has not scored in the series. He had 18 goals and 46 points in 82 games in the regular season.

Kuznetsov, 29, was fined for high-sticking Florida Panthers forward Noel Acciari during the Capitals’ 6-1 home win in Game 3.

Washington leads the first-round series 2-1 and hosts Game 4 on Monday night.

Kuznetsov, who has one goal in the series, amassed 24 goals and 78 points in 79 contests during the regular season.