‘I don’t have her number but…!’ – Murray responds after Swiatek calls him dream hitting partner

Andy Murray has taken to social media to potentially arrange a practice session with Iga Swiatek at Indian Wells.

Swiatek, winner of the 2019 French Open, was asked by the tennis channel who her dream hitting partner was after her 6-1, 6-3 win over Petra Martic on Friday.

And the Polish superstar said three-time Grand Slam winner Murray, who claimed a 6-3 6-2 victory over Adrian Mannarino in one hour and 24 minutes.

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“That’s a tough one. I would love to play with Andy Murray,” said Swiatek.

We actually had a little chat on Twitter so maybe it is going to be possible to finally play. He also seems like such a nice guy. Good sense of humour too!

And Murray, 34, took to social media to say that – while he did not have Swiatek’s number – he would be hitting at 3pm and she was free to join:

I don’t have her number unfortunately but I’m hitting at 3pm tomorrow if she wants to join?

Swiatek has previously practised with Rafael Nadal at Roland Garros but the 20-time Grand Slam winner is absent from Indian Wells, a fact Murray had lamented last week.

Murray spoke of his delight at appearing at Indian Wells, but admitted to slight disappointment at the absences of Nadal as well as Djokovic, and Federer.

“Yeah, I mean, obviously with everyone getting older, there’s going to be times where those guys are missing, missing events,” Murray said. “I’ve obviously had my fair share of misses the last few years, like we were saying, [it’s been] four years since I’ve last been here.

“It’s unfortunate with Rafa (Nadal) and Roger (Federer) being injured, and I think Novak (Djokovic), probably rightfully, is taking a break after the run that he’s had this year and just missing out at the US Open.

But I’m happy myself to be here. It’s a shame for the tournament that they’re not here. Certainly a couple of years ago, I wouldn’t have expected to be the only one playing.

“Obviously here in the desert, the very sort of light air, thin air, the ball travels very quickly through there and also the balls were very light as well,” Murray explained.

“That’s a bit different this year, which is good. The balls are pretty, pretty heavy and are travelling through the air a little bit slower, so they’re easier to control. I wish it had been like that in previous years, but conditions this year are a little bit more to how I like them.

“But yeah, traditionally when I’ve been playing here, this has been the tournament that I struggle with because of the conditions.”

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‘Let’s go!’ – Murray confirms safe return of lost wedding ring

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‘Let’s go!’ – Murray confirms safe return of lost wedding ring

Former world number one Sir Andy Murray has confirmed the safe return of his wedding ring having originally lost it while playing at Indian Wells.

The Brit will be competing at the prestigious tournament, often billed as the ‘fifth Grand Slam’, for the first time since 2017 – but he had endured a shocking start to the event after his wedding ring went missing.

Murray, 34, posted initially on Thursday to say that he had lost the ring after leaving his shoes under his car overnight.

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The three-time Grand Slam winner said on an Instagram post that he had left his shoes out to try to dry them out after a practice session. The Scot usually weaves his ring into his shoes while he is playing, but forgot to remove it and, thus, with the shoes taken during the night, so too was the ring.

But in an Instagram post 15 hours later Murray revealed that the shoes had been recovered and the ring was still there.

“I had to make a few calls today and chat to the security at the hotel,” he said. “A little update for everyone: Would you believe it? The shoes are back, the wedding ring is back and I’m back in the good books. Let’s go!”

Murray will face Frenchman Adrian Mannarino on Saturday morning in his first match since losing to Casper Ruud in San Diego last week.

Earlier on Tuesday, Murray had spoken of his delight at appearing at Indian Wells, but admitted to slight disappointment at the absences of Novak Djokovic, Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer.

“Yeah, I mean, obviously with everyone getting older, there’s going to be times where those guys are missing, missing events,” Murray said. “I’ve obviously had my fair share of misses the last few years, like we were saying, [it’s been] four years since I’ve last been here.

“It’s unfortunate with Rafa (Nadal) and Roger (Federer) being injured, and I think Novak (Djokovic), probably rightfully, is taking a break after the run that he’s had this year and just missing out at the US Open.

“But I’m happy myself to be here. It’s a shame for the tournament that they’re not here. Certainly a couple of years ago, I wouldn’t have expected to be the only one playing.

“Obviously here in the desert, the very sort of light air, thin air, the ball travels very quickly through there and also the balls were very light as well,” Murray explained.

“That’s a bit different this year, which is good. The balls are pretty, pretty heavy and are travelling through the air a little bit slower, so they’re easier to control. I wish it had been like that in previous years, but conditions this year are a little bit more to how I like them.

“But yeah, traditionally when I’ve been playing here, this has been the tournament that I struggle with because of the conditions.”

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'Shame they're not here' – Murray on Federer, Nadal, Djokovic missing Indian Wells

Andy Murray has spoken of his excitement at appearing at Indian Wells but also expressed his disappointment that the other three members of the original ‘Big Four’ are missing this year.

The Brit will be competing at the prestigious tournament, often billed as the ‘fifth Grand Slam’, for the first time since 2017 but Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic are all absent through injuries and requiring recuperation.
Indian Wells is one of only two Masters events that the world No. 121 has not previously won, and he has been handed a brutal draw. The 34-year-old will open his tournament against Adrian Mannarino of France, but could then meet Spain’s rising star Carlos Alcaraz in the second round and Olympic champion Alexander Zverev after that.

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Murray, who received a wildcard into the ATP Masters 1000 event, also has Italian stars Matteo Berrettini and Jannik Sinner in his quarter of the draw, but that has not diminished his dreams of having a positive run in the Californian desert.

“Yeah, I mean, obviously with everyone getting older, there’s going to be times where those guys are missing, missing events,” Murray said. “I’ve obviously had my fair share of misses the last few years, like we were saying, [it’s been] four years since I’ve last been here.

It’s unfortunate with Rafa (Nadal) and Roger (Federer) being injured, and I think Novak (Djokovic), probably rightfully, is taking a break after the run that he’s had this year and just missing out at the US Open.

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“But I’m happy myself to be here. It’s a shame for the tournament that they’re not here. Certainly a couple of years ago, I wouldn’t have expected to be the only one playing.

“Obviously here in the desert, the very sort of light air, thin air, the ball travels very quickly through there and also the balls were very light as well,” Murray explained.

“That’s a bit different this year, which is good. The balls are pretty, pretty heavy and are travelling through the air a little bit slower, so they’re easier to control. I wish it had been like that in previous years, but conditions this year are a little bit more to how I like them.

“But yeah, traditionally when I’ve been playing here, this has been the tournament that I struggle with because of the conditions.”

Murray will not the only Brit appearing at Indian Wells with US Open champion Emma Raducanu headlining the night session on Friday. Dan Evans and Cameron Norrie are also in action at the event.

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“I’m ready for the next challenge,” Raducanu said in her pre-tournament interview. “I had such a great time in New York and an amazing experience.

“It started to sink in gradually, but I think I still will need time for it to fully sink in. But yeah, it’s a great place here and I can’t wait to get started.

“I think the form that I had in New York was a gradual build up of so many weeks of tennis, and I think that definitely helped that playing a lot of matches. But yeah, we’ll see what the future holds.”

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Then and now: How much has changed in 932 days since last Indian Wells?

They say 932 days is a long time in tennis.

OK, they don’t, but it is. That’s the number of days that Indian Wells had gone without a professional tennis match before qualifying for the main draw started on Monday. The 2020 edition of the tournament was called off due to the Covid-19 pandemic and this season’s edition has been moved from March to October due to the restrictions in place earlier this year.

So what’s changed in tennis in the last 932 days? Plenty.

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Medvedev leads power shift

Perhaps most notably on the men’s side there will not be a former champion in the draw, with Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic, Dominic Thiem and Juan Martin del Potro all out. Thiem was the champion when the tournament was last played in 2019 as he won the first Masters title of his career. He is yet to win another, but he has been a part of a shift at the top of the game.

While there were few clear suggestions at Indian Wells in 2019 that the era of Djokovic, Nadal and Federer was coming to an end, they have only won five Masters titles between them since. There have also been two new Grand Slam winners, compared to none in the four years before the 2019 edition of Indian Wells. Daniil Medvedev, Stefanos Tsitsipas, Thiem and Alexander Zverev have all broken through and cemented their places at the top of the game and where there was a strong veteran presence in the top 10 in 2019, with six players aged 30 or over, now there are six players aged 25 or under.

And the overall Grand Slam standings have shifted dramatically too. When Indian Wells was last played there was a clear leader – Federer. Now there are three co-leaders. Of the three, only Federer has failed to win a Slam in the last 30 months. Nadal has gone from 17 to 20 with two French Open titles and one US Open title, while Djokovic has shot from 15 to 20. There’s one more up for grabs at the Australian Open in January before Indian Wells is staged again in its normal slot of March in 2022.

A few more notable absentees at this year’s Indian Wells are Marin Cilic, Borna Coric and Milos Raonic. Cilic and Coric were seeded 10th and 11th in 2019, now the Croatian pair are both outside the top 40 in the world and will not be playing this week. Raonic made the semi-finals at Indian Wells two years ago, but is also not competing this time around due to injury. Will any of the three be able to get back into the top 10 or 20 again? It seems unlikely with the young players coming through.

Jannik Sinner was outside the top 300 in the world in 2019, now he’s knocking on the door of the top 10. Felix Auger Aliassime, who beat Tsitsipas and Cameron Norrie at Indian Wells last time out, has gone from outside the top 50 to 11th in the world. Casper Ruud had just broken into the top 100 in early 2019, now he’s world No 10 and has won the most titles (5) of any player this year.

Raducanu, Swiatek, Gauff mix it up

The landscape also looks different on the WTA side, although the change has not been as dramatic. Almost all of the top 10 that competed at Indian Wells in 2019 are still near the top of the game, with Sloane Stephens, Serena Williams and Kiki Bertens the biggest fallers. Ashleigh Barty and Aryna Sabalenka have both improved their positions in the last two year, although they will not be at Indian Wells, and, like on the ATP Tour, there has been an injection of youth.

Iga Swiatek, 20, didn’t make it through qualifying when Indian Wells was last played, now she is ranked No 4 in the world. Sofia Kenin has gone from No 34 in the world to a top-10 player and Coco Gauff and Emma Raducanu have both burst onto the scene. Gauff, 17, was still largely playing at ITF level in early 2019, and it wasn’t until the summer that she made her breakthrough at Wimbledon when she beat Venus Williams and made the last 16. Raducanu, 18, was competing at ITF tournaments in China the last time that Indian Wells was played; now she has rocketed up to No 22 in the world after an incredible summer.

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The top 30 in 2019 also included four players who have now retired: Maria Sharapova, although she did not play Indian Wells that year due to a shoulder injury, Caroline Wozniacki, Carla Suarez Navarro and Bertens.

One thing that remains the same is Serena Williams’ quest to win a 24th Grand Slam title. In 2018 she lost two major finals and after Indian Wells in 2019 she would lose two more. She hasn’t been back to a final since and looks as though she will not play again this season as she recovers from the injury that kept her out of the US Open.

Edmund, Konta slip down rankings

Things also look different from a British perspective. Katie Boulter and Heather Watson both lost in qualifying in 2019 – Boulter has done the same this year while Watson is automatically in the main draw – and the highest-ranked British woman was Johanna Konta. She was unseeded for the tournament and lost to seventh seed Bertens in the third round. Konta has had a difficult 2021 season as she has split with her coach, tested positive for Covid-19 and had injuries that have impacted how much she can play, leading to her slipping down to No 82 in the world. Raducanu will lead the British charge this year.

Johanna Konta

Image credit: Getty Images

It has been a similar story for the British men as Kyle Edmund has gone from making the fourth round as the 22nd seed in 2019, to dropping outside the top 100 in the world. While Edmund has dropped down the rankings, Dan Evans and Norrie have moved up. They are both inside the top 20 and results this week will determine who comes out of Indian Wells as British No 1.

No towels, no line judges

What else has changed since Indian Wells has been away? Unlike in 2019 there will be no ball kids scampering off to fetch towels for players in between points. That has been eradicated due to the Covid-19 pandemic and line judges are also heading the same way. The electronic line calling used at the US Open will also be in place at Indian Wells. There will, though, be fans in the stands just as there was when the tournament was last played. Indian Wells is one of the largest venues on tour, with a main court holding 16,000 fans, second only in size to Arthur Ashe in New York among outdoor tennis stadiums. It has been reported that organisers expect the event to be at 60 per cent capacity over the 11 days.

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6,000 days and counting: Nadal reaches another top-10 milestone

Remember when Rafael Nadal wasn’t in the top 10 in the ATP world rankings? Probably not.

Nadal has now passed the milestone of 6,000 consecutive days inside the top 10, having broken in for the first time on April 25, 2005.

It’s an incredible testament to his longevity, and the record he holds for most consecutive weeks in the top 10 is unlikely to be broken soon. As of the start of this week, on September 27, Nadal has spent 836 weeks in a row inside the top 10 in the world. Second in the list is Jimmy Connors on 789 weeks, with Roger Federer in third on 734 weeks.

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And that total doesn’t include the 22 weeks that the rankings were frozen last year due to the suspension of the season during the Covid-19 pandemic.

Nadal, who made his debut on the ATP Tour in 2002, made it into the top 10 for the first time in 2005 after winning his first Barcelona title, beating Juan Carlos Ferrero in the final. It was the season that an 18-year-old Nadal would announce himself as a star, with Barcelona his fourth title of an 11-title season, still the highest total of his career. The top 10 at the time that Nadal broke through also featured Roger Federer, Lleyton Hewitt, Andy Roddick, Marat Safin, Gaston Gaudio, Tim Henman, Andre Agassi, Carlos Moya and David Nalbandian.

Novak Djokovic had only made his Grand Slam debut a few months earlier at the Australian Open, where he lost to Safin in the first round, and Federer was the only one of the ‘Big Three’ to have won any major titles, having already secured four. Barcelona was also just the fifth title of Nadal’s career; he has now won 88. Nadal finished the 2005 season as world No 2, a position he maintained for 160 consecutive weeks before finally overtaking Federer at the top of the rankings in August 2008.

Since that landmark victory in Barcelona, Nadal has won the tournament a record 12 times, along with 20 Grand Slam titles, putting him level with Djokovic and Federer on the all-time standings.

Nadal has won two titles this year but shut down his season in August in a bid to help him get back to full fitness. Despite not playing for the rest of 2021, Nadal seems unlikely to drop out of the top 10.

He is currently ranked No 6 in the world and does not have many points that will drop from his rankings until 2022. He is set to lose 400 points from the 2019 ATP Finals, 360 points from the 2019 Paris Masters, and 180 points from 2019 Indian Wells.

Nadal is on 5,815 ranking points, behind him are Matteo Berrettini (5,173 points), Dominic Thiem and Roger Federer (who are both out for the rest of the year at least due to injury), Casper Ruud (3,440 points), Felix Auger-Aliassime (3,368 points), Hubert Hurkacz (3,333 points) and Denis Shapovalov (3,265 points). It would take a few big performances in the remaining two months of the season for anyone to move above Nadal in the rankings.

Even going into 2022 Nadal does not have many points to defend as he only made the quarter-finals of the Australian Open this year. However, if he is not back to his best for the clay season then his top-10 run could be in danger.

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Nadal announced earlier this month that he is recovering after undergoing treatment on his foot injury. His last match was at the Citi Open at the start of August when he was beaten by Lloyd Harris.

Speaking about his recovery, he said: “It is a time that is a bit complicated on a personal and professional level. Honestly, with the illusion of improving and facing a process that is going to be difficult and painful at some point, but that I have to go through to get back in a position to fight for what I want. I am determined to do it.”

Nadal’s former coach and uncle, Toni Nadal, believes his nephew will be ready to go again in 2022.

“Things are going better,” he told Tennis Majors about the rehab. “He has set his sights on starting in Australia. He will be fine. I’m convinced. The idea is to have a great year 2022. He will put his all into it.”

Nadal recently teased fans that he may return to Laver Cup action in 2022, having missed the event this year. The Spaniard has been one of the stars of the Laver Cup, along with Federer, and hinted that a ‘Fedal’ reunion could be on the cards in London.

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Federer: 'A new, incredible player' will break 20 Grand Slam titles record

Roger Federer believes a new player will surpass ‘The Big Three’ and break his joint record of 20 Grand Slam titles alongside Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic.

With all three players, particularly Federer, approaching the latter stages of their decorated tennis careers, the question remains over who will go on to become the next dominant player in the men’s game.

Dominic Thiem has reached the final of every Grand Slam, apart from Wimbledon, while Daniil Medvedev most recently won the US Open with an impressive straight sets victory over Djokovic to deny him the calendar Grand Slam. Alexander Zverev, 24, won Olympic gold at Tokyo 2020 after stunning Djokovic in the semi-finals.

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Federer believes a ‘new, incredible’ player will come along and break the trio’s hugely impressive Slam record.

“I think yes,” he told GQ magazine.

“I feel like nowadays – and this is not to take anything away from Rafa, Novak or myself, for that matter – but, you know, I feel like it’s easier to dominate through the different surfaces nowadays.

“Back in the day, yes, we did have three grass-court events, but maybe the margins were slimmer. I feel like there were hard-court players, clay-court players and there weren’t so many players who could play on all surfaces.

“Sure, [Bjorn] Borg did it, but things were different. Players weren’t chasing one Slam after another like they are today and record after record. Nowadays such a strategy is much more part of your career.” Federer added.

So, yes, a new, incredible player will, I believe, break our run of 20 Grand Slams eventually – but not overnight!

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With Federer recovering from a third knee surgery and aiming to return for the 2022 Australian Open, he thinks Nadal and Djokovic “have a different mindset” to him at the moment.
Federer also believes tennis needs to do more to improve the relationship between the media and players to protect the mental health of players currently competing on the men’s and women’s tours.

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'Doubles next year?' – Nadal excites fans with Federer post on social media

Rafael Nadal has excited fans with a post on social media asking Roger Federer if he would like to play doubles with him next year.

The official Laver Cup account posted on Instagram announcing the O2 Arena in London as next year’s official host venue for the annual team event on Monday.

Nadal, who has played doubles alongside Federer in the past at various exhibitions, including the Laver Cup, was quick to respond with an intriguing question.

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Sharing the post to his personal Instagram story, the 35-year-old wrote: “@rogerfederer doubles next year?”

If nothing else, it is surely an encouraging indication of how the Spaniard feels about his injury struggles at the tail-end of the year – and perhaps how Federer may be shaping up for the new season having endured similar fitness frustrations.

Both legendary players were absent from the 2021 edition of the Laver Cup, but that did not stop Team Europe claiming a fourth victory in succession with ease in Boston.

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Bjorn Borg has been used to having Federer and Nadal among his ranks for the event – named in a tribute to another tennis legend, Rod Laver – and the Swede will be hopeful of having both back with him in London next year.

Federer was present as a watching supporter from the stands in Boston and, as his face flashed up on the screen, a huge roar went up around the arena.

On his own battle back to fitness in an interview with Mercedes-Benz prior to the event, Federer said: “I’m feeling actually really good, considering you know, that things are not as I hoped they would be, but I’m recovering well and the rehab is going really good I must say.

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“I’ve had no setbacks. You know, every day is a better day. I’m feeling strong and excited for what’s to come.

“I experienced it, of course, already a little bit last year. And I was actually surprised how somewhat easy it was for me to go through the rehab process, because I know it’s not everybody’s favourite thing to do, especially as a top athlete. But I think maybe after all these years of travelling, it’s also it was nice to be home having more time for the family and other things.

“Of course, I wish I could be back on a tennis court as quick as possible, but I have to be patient. And look, it’s a slow period right now. And I got to take it step by step. And so far so good. So I’m very happy.”

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'We need a revolution' – Federer supports Osaka; says players need help with press

Roger Federer has called for a “revolution” in how tennis and the media work together in order to relieve stress on players on the tour.

Naomi Osaka withdrew from the French Open earlier this year after saying she would not do press conferences to protect her mental health.

She was fined by the Grand Slam organisers for not doing post-match media after her opening round win and withdrew from the tournament the next day.

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Britain’s US Open winner Emma Raducanu, 18, was the subject of criticism from some sections of the press after withdrawing from her fourth round match in her maiden Wimbledon appearance with breathing difficulties.

Federer believes tennis needs to do more to help the game’s young stars, such as Osaka and Raducanu, deal with negativity from all forms of media.

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He told GQ Magazine: “I was following Emma Raducanu’s incredible run in Wimbledon and also Naomi Osaka these last few years – it’s been amazing, both of their stories.

“But it hurts when you see what happens and when they don’t feel well. The stress is so great.

“I think a lot has to be down to social media: the first 10 years of my life there was no social media, maybe I had just a website, then the next 10 years social media was everywhere.

“Also, in regards to this, the press situation does need to be reconsidered.

“I think I’m one of the athletes who’s done the most press – ever! And I agree that it’s always the same. Always.

“I think players, the tournaments, journalists, we need to sit down together in a room and go ‘OK, what would work for you and what works for us’.

We need a revolution.

“Or at least an evolution of where we are today. I think we do need to help, coach and mentor the younger generation more.

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“I can’t imagine going through the beginning of my career with social media; I have no clue how I would have handled it. For every 10 nice comments there’s always one negative comment and, of course, that is the one you focus on.

“It’s a horrible situation. Even when I am feeling down I know I need to act a certain way in front of the world’s press.

“We need to remember that tennis players are athletes and professionals, but we are also human too.”

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Federer: Djokovic, Nadal have a different mindset to me right now

Roger Federer says Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic “have a different mindset” to him at the moment as he continues his comeback from three knee surgeries.

Nadal and Djokovic are tied with the Swiss on 20 Grand Slams each and Federer’s rivals have competed more regularly on the tour and in Grand Slams since 2020.

The 40-year-old Swiss had two knee operations last year then further surgery after a quarter-final exit at Wimbledon. He said in August that he is targeting a return to the court in 2022.

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But Federer admits that his two rivals are in the mindset of challenging for titles while he just wants to get back to playing again.

“I think his [Djokovic’s] year again has been phenomenal,” Federer told GQ magazine.

“It’s going to be very interesting to see, for all three of us, how our careers continue. I mean, it’s amazing, to be honest, that all three of us are at 20 Grand Slams. Wow.

“When I was coming up the record was 12 and “Pistol” [Pete Sampras] got to it, you know, and went up to 14.

“Then I passed him in 2009, making it 15. That was clearly a huge moment for me, tying with him in Paris and then breaking it when at Wimbledon.

But I think the others are in a different mindset to me at the moment. I think all of us would obviously like to win more and do more, because that’s what you need to be like at this level.

“Like you said, losing in the quarters of Wimbledon normally is not good enough, but, for me, you know, the road has been hard and long and so my perspective is a little bit different.”

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Federer’s third knee operation led to his withdrawal from the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. He admits after a long injury layoff that he is unsure how long he will be able to continue playing for.

He added: “The Olympic decision was purely based on the knee and I knew I shouldn’t play.

“Of course, I would put everything on the line for the Olympics and big, big occasions, but no, I was not 100 per cent. And maybe that’s also partially an explanation for the face I pulled [at Wimbledon], the disappointment and anger and everything at the very end of the game.

“But it’s part of an athlete’s career, you know, to deal with setbacks. And that’s one thing that I need to figure out: how I can move on from here.”

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Federer: 'I Think The Worst Is Behind Me'

Roger Federer, who is recovering from August right knee surgery, made a late decision to attend this year’s Laver Cup. The Swiss legend is happy that he did.

“The reception I’ve received, everybody is so upbeat that I’m here. They wish me all the best and they don’t even see the crutches. They just want me to be good again and enjoy the weekend,” Federer said in an interview for the event with former World No. 1 Jim Courier. “I’ve seen some incredible tennis, some great matches and it’s been wonderful. I’m really happy I made the trip.”

The 20-time major champion admitted that it was a difficult process to decide whether to undergo a third right knee surgery after having two last year. But following Wimbledon, where he was “really unhappy” with his performance in reaching the quarter-finals, Federer opted to go through with it.

“I was just nowhere near where I wanted to be to play at the top, top level. But I tried my best and at the end… too much is too much. Now I’ve just got to take it step by step,” Federer said. “I’ve got to first walk again properly, run properly and then do the sidesteps and all the agility work and then eventually I’ve got to be back on the tennis court. But it’s going to take me a few more months and then we’ll see how things are at some point next year.

“I’ve got to take my time. I don’t want to rush into anything at this point. This is also for my life. I want to make sure I can do everything I want to do later on. There’s no rush with anything, so I’m actually in a really good place. I think the worst is behind me.

“I took the time and, I don’t know, I’m just really in a good place. I’m really happy.”

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Federer has received several thunderous ovations inside Boston’s TD Garden, where he has often been sitting in the front row watching the action or behind the scenes visiting with the players. The former World No. 1 played in the first three editions of the Laver Cup.

“I think Boston is a great city. The stadium is wonderful, the crowds have been incredible. Both teams are stacked with absolute quality and top players,” Federer said. “That’s what the idea was behind it: that everybody could come together, have the most incredible weekend, learn from one another and then hopefully that’s going to inspire them, motivate them and get them going for the rest of this year, next year.”